A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945

By Martin Kitchen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
The End of the War
in Asia
(October 1944-September 1945)

As the war in Europe drew to a close the British became increasingly concerned about the future of the ' Grand Alliance', and particularly about the role of the Soviet Union. When the Americans began to withdraw troops from Europe to finish off the Pacific war it was obvious that the Soviet Union would be overwhelmingly powerful on the Continent. Both Roosevelt and Truman refused to consider delaying the shipment of these troops and felt that British warnings were part of a sinister attempt to play the Russians off against the Americans in order to strengthen their position in Europe. With Britain facing a severe financial crisis and clearly relegated to the status of a second-rate power, there was precious little that could be done but to give way to the Americans. This did nothing to lessen the fury in Whitehall at having to listen to American denunciations of British imperialism and power politics, so frequently delivered with equal measures of platitude and hypocrisy.

The Japanese entrusted the land defence of the Philippines to General Yamashita, the victor of Malaya, but they staked everything on a battle at sea. Yamashita was to pin down the landing forces while the navy lured the American fleet to the north where it would be destroyed in a pincer movement. The Americans landed first at Leyte, a small island in the central Philippines, in order to divide the Japanese forces. The ensuing naval battle in Leyte Gulf was the largest naval engagement of all time. There were in fact four separate battles in which classic tactics of 'crossing the T' by Admiral Oldendorf's battleships were combined with the modern technique of sinking ships from aircraft carriers. The Japanese used their kamikaze pilots for the first time, but not to much effect. In the course of the battle, an unusually confused and confusing encounter,

-317-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 382

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.