Philadelphia: Neighborhoods, Division, and Conflict in a Postindustrial City

By Carolyn Adams; David Bartelt et al. | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1.
David Harvey, The Limits to Capital ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1982); John Logan and Harvey Molotch, Urban Fortunes ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987).
2.
Sam Bass Warner, The Private City: Philadelphia in Three Periods of Its Growth, 2d ed. ( Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1987), p. 52.
3.
Philadelphia City Planning Commission, A City of Neighborhoods ( Philadelphia: City Planning Commission, 1976), pp. 12-13. The street grid and rowhouse became so ingrained in Philadelphia's physical development pattern that attempts to modify them have seldom been successful. Even after World War II, when the Far Northeast section of the city was being developed, the city planning commission had to battle developers who wanted to continue the grid pattern into that region, obliterating hills, streams, and other features of the landscape. Ultimately, the grid was broken for only a small section of the city.
5.
J. Thomas Scharf and Thompson Westcott, History of Philadelphia ( Philadelphia: L. H. Everts, 1884), 3: 2239.
6.
Bruce Laurie and Mark Schmitz, "Manufacturing and Productivity: The Making of an Industrial Base, 1850-1880", in Theodore Hershberg, ed., Philadelphia: Work, Space, Family and Group Experience in the Nineteenth Century ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1981), p. 45.
7.
Philip Scranton, Proprietary Capitalism: The Textile Manufacture at Philadelphia, 1800-1885 ( Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1983).
8.
Digby Baltzell, Puritan Boston and Quaker Philadelphia ( New York: Free Press, 1979), esp. chap. 13.
9.
Scranton, Proprietary Capitalism, chap. 8.
10.
Laurie and Schmitz, Manufacturing and Productivity," pp. 85-87.
11.
Carolyn Golab, Immigrant Destinations ( Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1977).
12.
For a description of Philadelphia's most important "bosses," see Harold Zink, City Bosses in the United States: A Study of Twenty Municipal Bosses ( Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1930), chaps. 9, 10, and 11.
13.
W. W. Pierson, Annals of American Academy of Political and Social Science 29 ( March 1907): 124.
14.
Lincoln Steffens, The Shame of Cities (rpt., New York: P. Smith, 1984).
15.
Baltzell, Puritan Boston and Quaker Philadelphia.
16.
Delos Wilcox, Great Cities in America ( New York: Macmillan, 1910), p. 253.
17.
Zink, City Bosses, p. 201.
18.
W. E. B. DuBois, The Philadelphia Negro (rpt., New York: Shocken Books, 1967), pp. 373-81.

-189-

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Philadelphia: Neighborhoods, Division, and Conflict in a Postindustrial City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • COMPARATIVE AMERICAN CITIES ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Figures vii
  • Preface xi
  • Series Preface xiii
  • 1 - The Legacy of the Industrial City 3
  • 2 - Economic Erosion and the Growth of Inequality 30
  • 3 - Housing and Neighborhoods 66
  • 4 - Philadelphia's Redevelopment Process 100
  • 5 - Race, Class, and Philadelphia Politics 124
  • 6 - The Prospects for City-Suburban Accommodation 154
  • 7 - Alternative Scenarios for Philadelphia's Future 175
  • Appendixes 183
  • Notes 189
  • Index 203
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