Humanistic Perspectives in Medical Ethics

By Maurice B. Visscher | Go to book overview

being confined in a prison for "antisocial acts," while those chosen to "correct" them apparently condone murder under the mask of the law.

Is murder the exclusive domain of the legal profession and the criminal justice system, or does the medical profession have an ethical responsibility to deal with murder in a way compatible with its commitment to the sanctity of life?


References
1.
Arkansas State Police, Criminal Investigations Division, Case Report: Tucker State Prison Farm, Tucker, Arkansas, ( Little Rock: circa September, 1966).
2.
New York Times, July 29,1969, pp. 1, 20-21.
3.
Pine Bluff Commercial, Pine Bluff, Arkansas March 29,1967, p. 2.
4.
Walter Rugaber, New York Times, loc. cit.
5.
Pine Bluff Commercial, October 31, 1967, p. 1.
6.
Inmate Danny Bennett died in a Mississippi state prison on June 17, 1970, of "heat stroke," according to prison physician Dr. B. L. Hammack. An autopsy later disclosed that Bennett died as the result of "a combination of both heat stroke and the results of severe trauma such as might have been [in]flicted in a beating." A legislative investigating committee found that Bennett "was murdered by one or more persons" and that the prison doctor either "knowingly misrepresented" the cause of death or was negligent or incompetent "to make a correct determination" ( The Delta Democrat-Times, Greenville, Mississippi, January 20, 1971, p. 1).
7.
Arkansas Gazette, February 13, 1968, p. 1.

-265-

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