The Establishment of Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe, 1944-1949

By Norman Naimark; Leonid Gibianskii | Go to book overview

8 Polish Workers and the Stalinist Transformation

Padraic Kenney

The search for the origins of Stalinism is a dangerous minefield for a social historian. Any discussion of the first years of Communism in Eastern Europe will find it difficult to avoid a simple truth: without the occupation of the Soviet Army, there would have been no Communism in the region -- most certainly not in Poland. Stalinism is of course by its very name a Soviet phenomenon, its origins bound up in the history of the CPSU. The existence of the Soviet Bloc naturally inspires a search for similarities in rule and resistance, lessening the importance of differences among societies, though those societies are understood to be quite dissimilar from their Soviet counterpart. 1

It would be simple to state merely that we must learn something of the "other side" of Stalinist systems; that study of society will give us a more complete understanding of the history of Communist rule. This approach, however, exposes a basic misunderstanding of Stalinism as it was practiced in Eastern Europe. 2 Stalinism was an ideology of social transformation; therefore if we do not understand society, we can hardly understand Stalinism. Political histories have told us a great deal about how Communists ruled: they cannot explain why they ruled as they did; why Stalinist practices varied so much among states; and why Stalinist or post-Stalinist states fell apart as they did in 1989. For answers to these questions, society -- and in particular the working class -- must become our primary focus. The working class and its transformative

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Establishment of Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe, 1944-1949
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.