The Distaff Side: Representing the Female in Homer's Odyssey

By Beth Cohen | Go to book overview

assuring the continuity of civilized society through correct marriage, child-bearing, and preservation of the household. Their images reaffirmed the proper place of the female in the social structure of the Greek world.


NOTES
1
See Havelock, Chapter 11, this volume, and Lowenstam, 1992, particularly 169-70. For the phenomenon of text illustration in the Classical world, see Weitzmann, 1959 and 1970.
2
See Graham, Chapter 1, this volume; Powell, 1992, 183; and Shapiro, 1992, 73. Early representations were drawn, in particular, from the Polyphemos adventure (plate 7).
3
This may have been regulated by the Peisistratid tyrant Hipparchos in the last quarter of the sixth century; see Shapiro, 1993a and 1992, 72; cf. Shapiro, 1989, 43-46.
4
LIMC VI, s.v. "Odysseus", ( O. Touchefeu-Meynier), 946; Touchefeu- Meynier , 1968, 306, table 2.
5
The translations of the Odyssey here and in Chapters 10 ( Neils) and 11 ( Havelock) are by Seth L. Schein.
6
For early Greek Sirens outside Odyssey depictions and their Ancient Near Eastern sources, see Neils, Chapter 10, this volume; Buitron and Co hen , 1992, 109-10, 125-33; Hofstetter, 1990.
7
See Vermeule, 1979, 203; LIMC VI, s.v. "Odysseus", 962, no. 151; cf. Brilliant, Chapter 9, this volume.
8
Ling, 1991, 118, 119, fig. 120, "provenance unknown". I. D. Jenkins has confirmed the Pompeiian provenance of the painting in the records of the British Museum in a letter of September 1, 1993.
9
The Callimanopulos oinochoe has often been incorrectly dated to the first quarter of the fifth century, e. g., LIMC VI, s.v. "Odysseus", 962, no. 154. On the importance of this early representation, see Buitron and Cohen, 1992, 128, with bibliography; and Hofstetter, 1990, 100, no. A 139, 116-17.
10
See also Neils, Chapter 10, this volume. For the Sirens' seductive and erotic aspect, see Touchefeu-Meynier, 1968, 186-87, and Buitron and Cohen, 1992, 132.
11
Paquette, 1984, 206. This instrument was held in the left hand and beaten with the right and may be a more likely identification than the cymbal, which would have been used in a pair; cf. Christie's, cat. 1988, no. 34.
12
Trendall, 1987, 158, no. 272; LIMC VI, s.v. "Odysseus", 962, no. 156.
13
See West, 1992, 13.
14
Paquette, 206, figs. 209-11, P5-P10; e.g., tympana in South Italian vase painting, Trendall, 1989, figs. 52, 83, 119, 162.
15
Maas and Snyder, 1989, 58, 85-86, 114-15, 121. For music in the lives of Greek women, see also Berard, 1989, 91-92.

-50-

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The Distaff Side: Representing the Female in Homer's Odyssey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Contributors xiii
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Odyssey, History, and Women 3
  • Notes 14
  • 2 - Female Representations and Interpreting the Odyssey 17
  • Notes 26
  • 3 - Between Skylla and Penelope: Female Characters of the Odyssey in Archaic and Classical Greek Art 29
  • Notes 50
  • II - Female Representations in the Odyssey 59
  • 4 - The Plan of Athena 61
  • Notes 78
  • 5 - Sirens, Muses, and Female Narrators in the Odyssey 81
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Penelope as Moral Agent 93
  • Notes 109
  • 7 - Figuring Fidelity in Homer's Odyssey 117
  • Notes 146
  • III - Representations of Female Characters from the Odyssey in Ancient Art 153
  • 8 - Coming of Age in Phaiakia: The Meeting of Odysseus and Nausikaa 155
  • Notes 161
  • 9 - Kirke's Men: Swine and Sweethearts 165
  • Notes 173
  • 10 - Les Femmes Fatales: Skylla and the Sirens in Greek Art 175
  • Notes 183
  • 11 - The Intimate Act of Footwashing: Odyssey 19 185
  • Notes 196
  • References 201
  • Index 219
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