Walking to Work: Tramps in America, 1790-1935

By Eric H. Monkkonen | Go to book overview

Eric H. Monkkonen


Introduction

For at least a century, tramps have fascinated us. In the popular press, in literature, in short stories, and in folk tales, we have discussed them, portrayed them, and fantasized about them. Much more than it might at first appear, scholars have counted tramps, walked with them, photographed them, corresponded with them, tried to reform them, and even tried to change the socioeconomic or personal conditions which seem to have produced them. Yet in an important way, this literature is as marginal as its objects of interest. The reason is simple enough. We do not know how to think about tramps. Our inability to integrate them into a coherent view of society or social history mirrors their apparent social condition. The failure of historians to incorporate them as a subject has been masked by the earlier silence on tramps as integral members of society. Thus, even though the gamut of attitudes expressed in this previous literature is enormous, and although some of the extraordinarily sensitive and intelligent insights have been offset by others more execrable, few have been analytical or historical.

Recent developments in the study of social history make the understanding of tramps as a historical and social phenomenon possible. The articles collected in this book represent several different methodological and theoretical streams of recent social historical research. All aim at a whole view of American society, or societies, at including the excluded, and at understanding the complex currents of social change, drawing out the implications for the broad range of American experiences. Alert to and generally critical of earlier literary and reform traditions, the contributors to this book have all approached their examination of tramping with

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Walking to Work: Tramps in America, 1790-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.