Walking to Work: Tramps in America, 1790-1935

By Eric H. Monkkonen | Go to book overview

Jules Tygiel


Tramping Artisans: Carpenters in Industrial America, 1880-90

Over a quarter of a century ago, E. J. Hobsbawm wrote a provocative article describing the tramping system that emerged among skilled artisans in nineteenth-century Great Britain, detailing the travel habits of craftsmen and the practices established by the trade unions to accommodate them. 1 In contrast, social historians in the United States have paid increasing attention to measuring the mobility of Americans in the industrial age without examining the institutional mechanisms delineated by Hobsbawm. Studies of persistence have demonstrated the prominence of transience in working-class life in the United States, creating what Stephan Thernstrom and Peter Knights called a "floating proletariat." 2 Despite this growing body of scholarly literature concerning the dimension of geographic mobility, however, we know far less about the travel patterns of particular American artisan groups than we do of those studied by Hobsbawm. Why, when, and where they moved remain, for the most part, unknown. Nor is there a great deal of information describing the ways in which itinerancy affected the lives and and institutions of American workers. This study of one group of tramping artisans in the United States, the carpenters, shows how they created traditions of migration and complex communication networks which facilitated their accommodation to a fluid and mobile economic system in the late nineteenth century. Moreover, the problems of itinerancy actually fostered the organization of a national federation of carpenters unions in 1881.

Itinerancy had long been associated with the carpentry trade. "There is a streak of the nomad in every carpenter," wrote Robert Christie, "and itinerancy has in some measure characterized the trade since guild carpen-

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Walking to Work: Tramps in America, 1790-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.