The Critical Response to Eudora Welty's Fiction

By Laurie Champion | Go to book overview

analyses that apply Bakhtinian and Lacanian theories to Welty's fiction are particularly reflective of new critical directions. 180 In her essay written for this anthology, "Diverting Swine: The Magical Relevancies of Eudora Welty's Ruby Fisher and Circe", Dawn Trouard demonstrates new critical approaches to Welty's works. Trouard challenges the view that Ruby Fisher and Circe play roles that allow them to become hostage to male roles. She sees "Circe" as Welty's most feminist story, building on feminist analysis by Yaeger and Peter Schmidt. Yet Trouard more "aggressively locates powers" in the characters Ruby Fisher and Circe.

Welty continues to attract attention from critics all over the world. She lives in Jackson Mississippi and frequently gives interviews and public appearances. She often gives talks on the radio and on television, and she gives public readings and frequently attends literary conferences. Scholars who interview her often remark about her pleasant and warm personality. Scholars consider Welty's gifts to humanity among the most important gifts of any living Southern writer. Her works will surely remain in the literary canon as the mark of one of America's most talented writers.


NOTES
1
Katherine Anne Porter, "Introduction", A Curtain of Green ( New York: Doubleday, 1941) ix-xix.
2
Dale Mullen, "some Notes on the Stories of Eudora Welty", Mississippi Literary Review ( 1941): 21-24.
3
"New Writer", Time 24 Nov. 1941: 110-11.
4
John Lane, "An Original Newcomer", Times Liteary supplement 17 July 1943: 341.
5
Marianne Hauser, "'A Curtain of Green' and Other New Works of Fiction", New York Times Book Review 16 Nov. 1941: 6.
6
Arthur J. Carr, "Among Recent Books", Accent 2 ( 1942): 188-89.
7
Kay Boyle, "Full-Length Portrait", New Republic 24 Nov. 1941: 707-08.
8
Louise Bogan, "The Gothic Southm" Nation 6 Dec. 1941: 572.
9
Frederick Brantley, "A Curtain of Green: Themes and Attitudes", American Prefaces 7 ( 1942):241-51.
10
Robert J. Griffin, "Eudora Welty's A Curtain of Green", The Forties: Fiction, Poetry, Drama, ed. Warren French ( Deland, FL: Everett/Edwards, 1969) 101-10.
11
Michael Kreyling, "Modernism in Welty's A Curtain of Green and Other Stories", Southern Quarterly 20 ( 1982): 40-53.
12
Neil D. Isaacs, "Life for Phoenix", Sewanee Review 71.1 ( 1963): 75-81.
13
Charles E. May, "Why Sister Lives at the P.O"., Southern Humanities Review 12 ( 1978): 243-49.
14
Marinne Hauser, "Miss Welty's Fairy Tale", New York Times Book Review 1 Nov. 1942: 6-7.
15
Charles Shattuck, "Eudora Welty: The Robber Bridegroom", Accent 3 ( 1944): 124.
16
Alfred Kazin, An Enchanted World in America, New York Herald Tribune Books 25 Oct. 1942: Sec. viii, p.19.
17
Lionel Trilling, "American Fairy Tale", Nation 9 Dec. 1942: 687.
18
John Peale Biship, "The Violent Country", New Republic 16 Nov. 1942: 646-47.
19
Charles C. Clark, "The Robber Bridegroom: Realism and Fantasy on the Natchez Trace", Mississippi Quarterly 26 ( 1973): 625-28.

-25-

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