The Critical Response to John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath

By Barbara A. Heavilin | Go to book overview

Fermenting The Grapes of Wrath: From Violent Anger Distilling Sweet Concord

Michael Meyer

John Steinbeck's interest in Eastern thought, including the philosophy of Lao Tze and the precepts of Buddha, is now generally recognized by critics. Perhaps it also accounts for his wide popularity in such Asian nations as Korea, Thailand and Japan. Unfortunately, in the years that have passed since 1978 when Peter Lisca traced this Eastern influence on Cannery Row and John Ditsky similarly discussed East of Eden and the East, little has been done to connect Oriental tenets of belief with other texts in the Steinbeck canon.

Yet a consideration of the impact that Taoist philosophy may have had on Steinbeck's writing indicates that books other than Cannery Row and East of Eden have been informed by Eastern principles. In fact, Robert DeMott has determined in Steinbeck's Reading that a copy of the Tao Teh Ching was available to Steinbeck in the lab of his close friend, Ed Ricketts. Finally, Steinbeck's tendency to rewrite or reinterpret classics such as Everyman (The Wayward Bus), King Arthur ( Tortilla Flat), Shakespeare ( The Winter of Our Discontent), and the Bible ( East of Eden, The Grapes of Wrath) makes it intriguingly possible that he may also have embedded Eastern precepts in his texts--especially the thought

-327-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Critical Response to John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 366

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.