Narrative Psychology: The Storied Nature of Human Conduct

By Theodore R. Sarbin | Go to book overview

About the Editor and Contributors

Stephen Crites has been a member of the department of religion at Wesleyan University since 1961. He is currently the Hedding Professor of Moral Science. He has held visiting professorships in the departments of philosophy at the Berkeley and San Diego campuses of the University of California and in the religion department at the University of Virginia. He received the Ph.D. from Yale University in 1961. His scholarly interests center on nineteenth century continental philosophy and religious thought. He has published many articles and some books related to Hegel and Kierkegaard in particular, and is presently completing a book treating the transformation of Christian themes in the development of Hegel's thought. He has also written a number of articles on the aesthetic formation of experience with special emphasis on narrative forms, and is currently at work on a book treating this theme.

Kenneth J. Gergen is Professor of Psychology at Swarthmore College. He received his Ph.D. at Duke University and taught at Harvard University for five years before coming to Swarthmore. His major research interests have been widespread, and have included such domains as the self, altruism, social explanation, and social construction. His persistent concerns with problems of historical change, concepts of mind, and foundationalist philosophy have also been manifest in a number of writings in metapsychology. Many of these concerns are represented in his book, Toward Transformation in Social Knowledge ( 1982). He works closely with his wife, Mary M. Gergen, on many projects. Together they have authored a textbook on social psychology and edited a volume on historical social psychology.

Mary M. Gergen is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Pennsylvania State University, Delaware County Campus. She received B.S. and M.S. degrees at the University of Minnesota, and the Ph.D. at Temple University in Philadelphia. Her interests currently involve issues in women's studies using narrative analysis within a social constructionist paradigm. Previous research work has focused on social explanation and reactions to aid. She has collaborated with her husband, Kenneth J. Gergen, at Harvard University and Swarthmore College. They are co-authors of Social Psychology ( 1983) and co-editors of

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