Mythopoetic Perspectives of Men's Healing Work: An Anthology for Therapists and Others

By Edward Read Barton | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

On Saturday evening of the American Men's Studies Conference in Washington, D.C., James Doyle, Douglas Hindman, and I were sitting around the table at a Potomac River bank restaurant. I mentioned to Jim that based on my archiving theses and dissertations for the Changing Men Collections (CMC) in the Special Collections Division of the Michigan State University Libraries that I knew of several potential journal articles about mythopoetic men's work for the Journal of Men's Studies (JMS). Jim indicated that if I gave him their names and addresses, he would contact them. The next morning I woke up thinking that I had already talked to most of those scholars, so I offered to be guest editor of a mythopoetic perspective thematic issue of the JMS.

Thanks to Jim Doyle for agreeing to allow me to be guest editor and providing me guidance as the thematic issue progressed. I also thank Jim Doyle for releasing me from the thematic issue when it outgrew JMS. That release allowed this book to go forward.

Thanks to all the reviewers who took time to review the drafts of the chapters in this book: Martin Acker, Marvin Allen, Robert Bly, Nonna Bobbitt, Robert Boger, Bryan Bolwahn, Stephen B. Boyd, Marsha Carolan, Douglas Campbell, Stanley Cunningham, Bruce R. Curtis, Thomas Dean, David Dollahite, William Doty, Richard F. Doyle, Philip Dunn, Sam Femiamo, Roy Fish, Wesley Good- enough, Robert Griffore, Christopher Harding, Douglas Hindman, David Imig, Ralph Johnson, Kevin Kelly, Gary Kiveles, David Kruger, Nedra R. Lander, Robert Lee, Jordon Levin, Ross T. Lucas, Eric Mankowski, Kenneth Maton, G. Stanley Meloy, Mark W. Muesse, Danielle Nahon, Linda Nelson, Barbara H. Settles, Thomas Williamson, and Jeffrey Zeth, CSW.

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