Mythopoetic Perspectives of Men's Healing Work: An Anthology for Therapists and Others

By Edward Read Barton | Go to book overview
meetings, gathering, or conferences. Indeed, one mythopoetic informant told me that when his "brothers" visit him at his home, their ritual exchange of hugs always occurs inside the front door, so that the neighbors "don't get the wrong idea." Nonetheless, it is intriguing to imagine the potential effect if such clearly counterhegemonic practices were to be publicly displayed. Imagine, for example, a contingent of majority straight mythopoetic men marching in a gay pride parade, deploying group massage as a potent symbol of their support for their male-identified brothers.
9.
Prior to the weekend, all would-be New Warriors must sign an agreement to the effect that their experience on the New Warrior Training Adventure will remain strictly confidential. Obviously, Stanton's word was not good; he broke his agreement of confidentiality.
10.
Readers unfamiliar with mythopoetic events should understand that this event is quite different from the outdoor men's gathering described by Gabriel, or the New Warrior Training Adventure, an initiatory experience, described by Stanton. In some ways like a typical academic or professional conference, the First International Men's Conference, organized by Marvin Allen, occurred in a hotel with scheduled speakers and workshops. The setting of this semipublic, gender-inclusive conference contrasts sharply with the private, men-only camping experience of the men's gathering (described by Gabriel) or the private, initiatory experience of the NWTA weekend (described by Stanton).
11.
For a discussion of the interpellative power of realist narrative, see, for example, Belsey ( 1988), especially chapter 3 , "Addressing the Subject."

REFERENCES

Adler J. ( 1991). "Drums, sweat and tears". Newsweek, pp. 46-47.

Althusser L. ( 1969). Lenin and philosophy and other essays. London: Verso.

Belsey C. ( 1988). Critical practice. London: Routledge.

Bly R. ( 1990). Iron John. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Clines F. X. ( 1993, February 23). "Men's movement challenges machismo in prison". New York Times, p. C18.

Collins G. ( 1991, October). "Warning: Vikings in the office". Working Woman, 116, 114.

DiPrima D. ( 1992, September). "The guys' movement". Seventeen, 51, 86.

Dittes J., Schmidt S., & J. Baumgaertner ( 1991, May-June). "Being a man". Christian Century, 108, 588-596.

Doubiago S. ( 1993, March-April). "Enemy of the mother: A feminist response to the men's movement". Ms, 2, 82-85.

Ferguson A. ( 1992, January). "America's new man". American Spectator, 25, 26-33.

Gabriel T. ( 1990, October 14). "Call of the wildmen". New York Times Magazine, pp. 36- 39, 42, 47.

Gordon C. ( 1991, November 18). "What is it that men really want?" Macclean's, p. 13.

Gross D. ( 1990, April 16). "The gender rap". New Republic, pp. 11-14.

Hall S. ( 1977). Culture, the media, and the "ideological effect. In J. Curran, M. Gurevitch , & J. Woollacott (Eds.), Mass communication and society (pp. 315-348). Beverly Hills: Sage.

Hall S. ( 1990). Encoding, decoding. In S. During (Ed.), The cultural studies reader (pp. 90-103). London: Routledge.

Harrison B. G. ( 1991, October). "Campfire boys: Why the men's movement is hot". Mademoiselle, 97, 94, 96.

-98-

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