Mythopoetic Perspectives of Men's Healing Work: An Anthology for Therapists and Others

By Edward Read Barton | Go to book overview
by my faculty advisers. Even so, bias cannot be ruled out. The following research questions should be studied by researchers outside the MKP in the effort to eliminate possible interpreter bias:
What in the weekend experience changes these men, and are the changes long term?
What is the impact of the MKP experiences on the family structure, relationships, and others around these men?

CONCLUSION

The NWTA and the NWIT do not appear to be a repackaging of a dominant controlling patriarchy. It appears from the research that the overall mission of MKP is to lead men to lives of service. That is not a dominant controlling patriarchy. What about the name warrior in the work of the MKP? Starhawk ( 1992) makes the point that the word warrior carries a lot of negative and violent images with it and suggests that healers or fighters may be a more appropriate name for men who claim to be discarding the old vision of the warrior conqueror. She makes a valid point. If we are to make positive changes, we need to do it in a way that treats all people with integrity, dignity, and respect. The NWTA and the NWIT appear to be doing this.

Social workers need many avenues to help alleviate the suffering of the various groups of people they serve. If these studies are any indication, the MKP may be helping to alleviate the suffering of many men. It is our job as social workers to learn what we can from this organization and training, and participate if we are male and choose to participate, so as to use what we can to help those who suffer. Where do we go from here? Moore and Gillette ( 1992) stated, "We believe both men and women have encoded deep inside an understanding of how to use their power for blessing and liberation. With the Navajo, we have faith that human beings can once again find the Blessingway" (p. 9).


NOTE

The papers on the two studies are (1) "Heuristic Study of the New Warriors Experience: A Rite of Passage into a New Masculinity," and (2) "Ethnographic Study of the New Warrior Training Adventure. A Vision of a Mature Masculinity or a Re-packaging of Dominant Patriarchy." Anyone wanting a copy of the complete research studies may contact the author or order them through inter-library loan from the "Changing Men Collections." Michigan State University Libraries, East Lansing, Michigan.


REFERENCES

Adair M. ( 1992). "Will the real men's movement please stand up?" In K. L. Hagan (Ed.), Women respond to the men's movement (pp. 55-68). New York: HarperCollins.

-222-

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