Mythopoetic Perspectives of Men's Healing Work: An Anthology for Therapists and Others

By Edward Read Barton | Go to book overview

PATR IV
FEMINIST ROUNDTABLE

INTRODUCTION TO FEMINIST ROUNDTABLE

Part IV consists of chapters by authors from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada.

The first in the Roundtable is Jorgen Lorentzen ( 1998) of the University of Oslo, Norway, and his review of Kimmel The politics of manhood: Profeminist men respond to the mythopoetic men's movement (and the mythopoetic leaders answer). After discussing the question of what is a movement and essentialism, Lorentzen tackles the topic of "women and feminism."

It is pretty daring to say that someone with a foggy understanding of feminism is an antifeminist. I agree that the mythopoets have been unclear and weak on this issue.

On the other hand,

I find it puzzling to read some of the articles' harsh words against Bly and the movement, when Bly has worked with the feminist movement before some of the writers in this book could walk. The same goes for Shepherd Bliss and others. Is it not strange that the only ones who call themselves feminists are the mythopoets, Marvin Allen and Shepherd Bliss, while their critics call themselves profeminist? In my thinking, either you are feminist or not, either you are working to end oppression of women and the patriarchy, or you are not, feminism is a theory and a practice, not a gender. Men are feminists as are women. If American profeminists started to think this way, they would not be so afraid of being politically correct. Perhaps the profeminists need a retreat into the woods to work on how to be less politically correct, which means how to be honest and unafraid of your own inner meanings. And which could also mean, in another language, how to

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