Mythopoetic Perspectives of Men's Healing Work: An Anthology for Therapists and Others

By Edward Read Barton | Go to book overview

Conclusion

Four main themes run through this book: the parallels between feminists, feminism, and mythopoetic men's work; the emotional healing aspect of mythopoetic men's work, which is beneficial to the men who participate as well as those with whom they interact; men reinterpreting old stories and myths for themselves as part of their personal healing process; and the mythopoetic perspective as a useful approach for people in the healing professions for assisting men, women, and children in the healing process.

On a more personal note, I have struggled with whether to write this conclusion from my head or from my heart. Will I be liked for what I say or will I be criticized/ridiculed/shamed if I write from my heart? If I do the latter, will it prevent me from getting an academic position and/or will it block future promotions? As I write this, I am reminded of Carlos Castenada's reporting of Don Juan's comment that "the real accomplishment in life is the art of being a warrior, which is the only way to balance the terror of being a man with the wonder of being a man." There is a similar terror and wonder as I write this conclusion. I am walking through my fears/my terror and writing this by being vulnerable, open, and sharing my thoughts, feelings, and fears from a mythopoetic perspective.

In 1998 there were three main men's work events in which I participated that had an influence on me, each of which corresponds to one of the main themes of this book. The first event was Men & Masculinity (M&M) SUNY-Stonybrook. The key event for me at M&M was the speech by Gloria Steinem. It was not so much what she said but the fact that I bought her book Revolution from Within and read it during the rest of the year.

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