A Professional Development School Partnership: Conflict and Collaboration

By Renee W. Campoy | Go to book overview
Teachers prepared in professional development schools are more familiar with the practices required in today's schools than those who obtain clinical experiences in other ways.
Professional development conducted by professional development schools is more closely integrated with perservice teacher education (and vice versa).
Teachers perceive that professional development obtained through a PDS is more valuable than that obtained in traditional ways.
Administrators report that they prefer to hire teachers whose clinical training occurred at a professional development school.
Teacher associations believe professional development schools contribute to the enhancement of the profession.
Universities benefit from teachers who are trained in professional development schools because such teachers help prepare students to perform more successfully at the university level.
Universities benefit from professional development schools because they generate tuition and fees in connection with the preservice and professional development coursework completed in the PDS.
Local school districts benefit from professional development schools because they reduce recruiting costs, retraining costs, legal fees (better teachers mean fewer costs for firing teachers), and professional development needs.
Local school districts benefit from professional development schools because they are useful sources of research information concerning the quality of new programs.
Teachers working in PDSs are more likely to pursue graduate study to enhance their skills as teachers and teacher mentors.
P-12 students in PDSs have increased hours of adult attention in comparison to similar students in other schools.
Teachers in PDSs exhibit more reflective practice than teachers in other schools.
New teachers prepared through PDSs exhibit more reflective practice than teachers prepared via other kinds of clinical experiences.
New teachers prepared though PDSs assume leadership roles among their peers more quickly than teachers prepared in other ways.
Universities typically view themselves as having a substantial responsibility to the community. Service to P-12 schools discharges part of such responsibility.
Better teachers make better schools. PDSs help businesses secure better workers because P-12 students are better educated by teachers prepared in professional development schools. (pp. 6-7)

SUMMARY

In reviewing the literature on PDSs, the findings that were most compelling were those that mirrored the findings observed in the field dur

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A Professional Development School Partnership: Conflict and Collaboration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Part I Context 1
  • Chapter 1 Introduction and PDS as a Reform Initiative 12
  • Chapter 2 Methodology of the Case Study 15
  • Note 24
  • Chapter 3 Context of the PDS 34
  • Part II Foreshadowed Problems, Findings, and Conclusions 37
  • Chapter 4 Partnership Development 51
  • Chapter 5 University Student Benefits 66
  • Chapter 6 Elementary Student Benefits 78
  • Chapter 7 Teacher Development Issues 92
  • Chapter 8 University Faculty Development Issues 107
  • Chapter 9 Institutionalization of the Partnership 122
  • Chapter 10 Summaries, Generalizations, and Lessons Learned 138
  • Afterword 139
  • Bibliography 141
  • Index 147
  • About the Author 151
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