A Professional Development School Partnership: Conflict and Collaboration

By Renee W. Campoy | Go to book overview

the help of Henders, the tutor was provided additional strategies to help the child decode the unfamiliar text. If this had been in a non-PDS tutoring session, chances are that the instructor would not have been in the building to assist and the tutor and the child would have erroneously struggled on. Hopefully, this tutoring incident also became a topic of discussion in the next course session where Henders could talk about the limitations of phonics and help the university students to consider the benefits of the other language cueing systems. One of the most powerful aspects of a PDS-based course was that the problems experienced in the field could then become the topic of course discussion. It was observed that this type of in situ discovery could be particularly meaningful to education students who benefited from connecting course theory to classroom practice.

In the next observed tutoring session, the pair seemed to work happily together.

The tutor was going over a typed story written in sections with spaces between the paragraphs to allow a written response or a drawing to be completed. The tutor whispered to the observer that it was a comprehension lesson. The student was drawing a picture and then she explained her picture to the tutor. The two worked on the meaning of the next paragraph together, the child reading and the tutor asking questions. This child read fluently and only needed occasional help with a word. After reading a paragraph, it was illustrated with great detail and color. The story was about a town where all of the food the people ate fell from the sky. The child then drew a picture of food falling from the sky and the people standing underneath. The child told the tutor that she did not understand, so they talked about the benefits of living in such a town. It was soon after this discussion, the child complained that she was tired and the session ended.

During this tutoring session, the participants appeared successfully and happily engaged during a reading comprehension lesson. The instruction was at a beneficial instructional level for the child, and the university student was supportive and prepared with strategies to help the child.


SUMMARY

From the perspective of the elementary students, the PDS tutoring sessions at Jackson were highly successful and beneficial. The benefit most often cited by the students was the additional help they received with classwork. These students urgently expressed a need for this help, recognizing that it could not always always be provided by their teachers in the regular classroom. The tutoring program seemed to act as a safety net for students with questions, or for those who were having problems with a concept. One student said, "I would have them come ev-

-78-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Professional Development School Partnership: Conflict and Collaboration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Part I Context 1
  • Chapter 1 Introduction and PDS as a Reform Initiative 12
  • Chapter 2 Methodology of the Case Study 15
  • Note 24
  • Chapter 3 Context of the PDS 34
  • Part II Foreshadowed Problems, Findings, and Conclusions 37
  • Chapter 4 Partnership Development 51
  • Chapter 5 University Student Benefits 66
  • Chapter 6 Elementary Student Benefits 78
  • Chapter 7 Teacher Development Issues 92
  • Chapter 8 University Faculty Development Issues 107
  • Chapter 9 Institutionalization of the Partnership 122
  • Chapter 10 Summaries, Generalizations, and Lessons Learned 138
  • Afterword 139
  • Bibliography 141
  • Index 147
  • About the Author 151
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 154

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.