A Professional Development School Partnership: Conflict and Collaboration

By Renee W. Campoy | Go to book overview

sion would risk alienating and further decreasing the prestige of teacher education with respect to the rest of the university community. Many university teacher educators greatly value their association with the university and the liberal arts tradition in education, and they would oppose PDS policy that threatened to undermine that association.

Policy to accommodate the PDS would also alter the relationship of theory to practice, with the new balance to greatly favor practice. As PDSs and classroom teachers assumed more responsibility for the induction of new teachers, the university would lose influence over that process, as happened in Great Britain, where higher education lost influence over teacher education to specialized teacher-training colleges ( Taylor, 1997). The national debate around issues of the PDS even recall the old arguments questioning if teacher education in any form belongs at the university ( Clinchy, 1994; Haberman, 1971), but many university educators still believe that higher education has an important contribution to make to teacher education.


SUMMARY

In analyzing the findings derived from university faculty perceptions of working in the Jackson PDS, it is clear that this was one of the least successful aspects of the partnership. Faculty efforts to improve the classroom instruction in the school failed, and success in changing university policy to accommodate PDS faculty was limited. Although university faculty attempted to provide meaningful staff development experiences for the teachers, the faculty acknowledged that they were not able to accomplish this without administrative support. The faculty realized that the Jackson teachers needed an intense level of intervention that they were unable to provide, given their other professional responsibilities. Although the staff development efforts were reported as satisfactory by the teachers, these efforts were not of the type or intensity necessary to produce the substantive changes in classroom behavior called for by the PDS philosophy. The faculty recognized that the structures for organizing change at the school and the university were inadequate, but it was unclear to them who was responsible for initiating these structures. Was it university administration, the principal as the instructional leader of the school, or the teachers themselves? The Jackson PDS, on a local level, grappled with and failed to discover, satisfactory solutions to questions of policy, reward, and institutional change that are also a part of the national PDS debate.

The PDS is the latest attempt by teacher education to solve some of the unsatisfactory aspects of its association with higher education, and to reconcile the theory and practice debate within institutions. Because this is a sensitive area in U.S. education, the PDS has become something

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A Professional Development School Partnership: Conflict and Collaboration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Part I Context 1
  • Chapter 1 Introduction and PDS as a Reform Initiative 12
  • Chapter 2 Methodology of the Case Study 15
  • Note 24
  • Chapter 3 Context of the PDS 34
  • Part II Foreshadowed Problems, Findings, and Conclusions 37
  • Chapter 4 Partnership Development 51
  • Chapter 5 University Student Benefits 66
  • Chapter 6 Elementary Student Benefits 78
  • Chapter 7 Teacher Development Issues 92
  • Chapter 8 University Faculty Development Issues 107
  • Chapter 9 Institutionalization of the Partnership 122
  • Chapter 10 Summaries, Generalizations, and Lessons Learned 138
  • Afterword 139
  • Bibliography 141
  • Index 147
  • About the Author 151
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