The Third Career: Revisiting the Home vs. Work Choice in Middle Age

By Milica Z. Bookman | Go to book overview

Selected Bibliography

Amott Teresa, and Julie Matthaei, Race, Gender and Work: A Multicultural Economic History of Women in the United States, Boston: South End Press, 1991.

Baltzell E. Digby, Philadelphia Gentlemen: The Making of National Upper Class, Glencoe, Ill.: Free Press, 1958.

Bardwick Judith M., In Transition: How Feminism, Sexual Liberation, and the Search for Self-Fulfillment Have Altered America, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1979.

Barnett Rosalind C., and Carol Rivers, She Works, He Works, New York: Ford Foundation.

Barrett Nancy, "Obstacles to Economic Parity for Women," The American Economic Review, 72, May 1982, pp. 160-165.

Berkun Cleo S., "Changing Appearance for Women in the Middle Years of Life: Trauma?" in Elizabeth Markson, ed., Older Women, Lexington, Mass.: Lexington Books, 1983.

Bianchi Suzanne, and Daphne Spain, American Women: Three Decades of Change, Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, 1983.

Blau, Francine D., and Marianne A. Ferber, The Economics of Women, Men and Work, 2nd Ed., Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1992.

Burggraf Shirley, The Feminine Economy and Economic Man, Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1998.

Coontz Stephanie, The Way We Really Are: Coming to Terms with America's Changing Families, New York: Basic Books, 1992.

Daniels Arlene Kaplan, Invisible Careers, Women Civic Leaders from the Volunteer World, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988.

Deem Rosemary, All Work and No Play? The Sociology of Women and Leisure, Milton Keynes: Open University Press, 1996.

Dinnerstein Myra, Women Between Two Worlds, Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992.

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The Third Career: Revisiting the Home vs. Work Choice in Middle Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Part I REALITIES xix
  • Chapter 1: The Profile of Middle-Aged Women with Choices 1
  • Chapter 2: Evolving Expectations of Women with Choices 17
  • Part II INCENTIVES 43
  • Chapter 3 the Transformation of Aspirations 45
  • Notes 60
  • Chapter 4: The Redefinition of Leisure 63
  • Chapter 5: The Reevaluation of Volunteer Work 79
  • Part III CONDITIONS 89
  • Chapter 7: The Accommodating Work Environment 101
  • Part IV CAPACITIES 119
  • Chapter 8: Advantages to Be Harnessed 121
  • Chapter 9: Obstacles to Be Overcome 137
  • Part V BENEFITS 155
  • Chapter 10 Social Benefits: the Economic Contribution of Women with Choices 157
  • Notes 177
  • Chapter 11: Individual Benefits 179
  • Appendix I Method 189
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix II Empirical Overview: Women with Choices in America and in the Sample 193
  • Notes 197
  • Appendix III The Survey 199
  • Selected Bibliography 211
  • Index 215
  • About the Author 219
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