Trade, Industrialization, and Integration in Twentieth-Century Central America

By Irma Tirado de Alonso | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

Irma T. de Alonso is a Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator in the Department of Economics, Florida International University, in Miami. Dr. Alonso received her Ph.D. degree in economics ( 1969) from the University of York, England, and her M.A. ( 1965) and B.A. ( 1963) degrees in economics from the University of Puerto Rico, at Rio Piedras.

Juan J. Buttari is a Senior Economist with the U.S. Foreign Service, Agency for International Development. Dr. Butari received his Ph.D. ( 1972) and M.A. ( 1970) degrees in economics from Georgetown University in Washington D.C. He holds a B.A. ( 1964) degree in economics from the University of Puerto Rico, at Rio Piedras.

Luis René, Cáceres is a Senior Economist with the Interamerican Development Bank. He holds a Ph.D. degree ( 1978) from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City and a B.S. degree in electrical engineering ( 1967) from Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, Illinois.

Patrick C. Flower is a Ph.D. candidate in economics at the University of New Orleans, Louisiana.

David R. Hicks is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. Dr. Hicks earned his Ph.D. ( 1980) and M.A. ( 1971) degrees in geography from Michigan State University. His B.A. ( 1965) degree was earned at the University of Central Michigan.

Carlos Arturo Imendia is Chief Economist at the Central American Bank for Economic Integration. He received his B.A. ( 1972) from the University José Simeón Cañas and an M.A. ( 1974) degree in economics from Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

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Trade, Industrialization, and Integration in Twentieth-Century Central America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface xi
  • PART I INTRODUCTION 1
  • 1: CENTRAL AMERICA: THE CHALLENGES OF TRADE, INDUSTRIALIZATION, and INTEGRATION IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 3
  • 2: A MACROECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF CENTRAL AMERICA 15
  • SUMMARY AND OVERVIEW 36
  • Note 36
  • PART II TRADE IN CENTRAL AMERICA 39
  • 3: THE STRUCTURE OF TRADE IN CENTRAL AMERICA 41
  • SUMMARY 58
  • Notes 59
  • References 59
  • 4: IDUSTRIALIZATION and TRADE IN CENTRAL AMERICA 61
  • Notes 85
  • References 85
  • 5: MEXICO AS A POTENTIAL MARKET FOR CENTRAL AMERICAN and CARIBBEAN PRODUCTS 87
  • Notes 98
  • PART III INDUSTRIALIZATION AND INTEGRATION IN CENTRAL AMERICA 101
  • 6: THE INTENSITY OF CENTRAL AMERICAN ECONOMIC INTEGRATION 103
  • CONCLUSIONS 111
  • Notes 113
  • Notes 114
  • 7: ASSEMBLY OPERATIONS IN CENTRAL AMERICA 117
  • References 149
  • 8: PANAMA: ECONOMIC INTEGRATION ALTERNATIVES, IMPLICATIONS, and PERSPECTIVES 153
  • Notes 178
  • References 179
  • 9: THE CENTRAL AMERICAN COMMON MARKET: AN ANALYSIS Of WELFARE EFFECTS FROM 1970 TO 1984 183
  • Conclusion 202
  • Notes 203
  • Notes 204
  • PART IV SPECIAL ISSUES 207
  • 10: ECONOMIC PROSPECTS FOR CENTRAL AMERICA IN THE DECADE OF THE 1990S 209
  • Notes 220
  • REFFERENCES 220
  • 11: A REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICIES and STRATEGIES FOR TRADE and INDUSTRIALIZATION IN CENTRAL AMERICA 223
  • CONCLUSION: WHERE TO FROM HERE? 232
  • References 235
  • 12: THE DILEMMA OF EXPORT RIVIVAL: NICARAGUAN AGRICULTURE AT A TURNING POINT 237
  • Notes 251
  • References 251
  • 13: CHALLENGES and PROSPECTS FOR CENTRAL AMERICA IN A GLOBAL TRADE CONTEXT 253
  • BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY 271
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 277
  • Index 279
  • ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS 289
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