Local Government Information and Training Needs in the 21st Century

By Jack P. Desario; Sue R. Faerman et al. | Go to book overview

the size of the city seemed to have the greatest impact, with smaller cities expressing the greatest needs, and yet clearly having the least amount of resources to meet these needs. These differences, however, tend to be marginal.

Acquiring state-of-the-art training and education for local government personnel is a concern shared by many leaders in the public sector ( Poister and Streib, 1989a and 1989b; Slack, 1990), private-sector consulting firms ( Ammons and Glass, 1988), and universities ( Dunn, Gibson, and Whorton, 1985; Hambrick, 1983). Continual training and education offer a wide variety of opportunities to local government managers, including that of increasing the staff's sense of professionalism ( Wiseman, 1989) and its role in the decision-making process ( Accordino, 1989), as well as its understanding of the political environment ( Lewis and Raffel, 1988).

Even with Clinton's Democratic administration, municipalities will need to continue to search for answers and solutions in sources other than the federal government. Clearly, the message from President Clinton is a change from dependency to self-sufficiency. Municipalities will have to find increased capacity for acquiring additional expertise either from within the ranks of their own work force or from other sources closer to home than Washington.


NOTE
1.
Items constituting each scale are as follows:
Scale Questionnaire item
Information and Local Government Data Bank
Library Utilization Legislative Histories
Local Government Documents/Reports
"How To" /Model Manuals
Professional Journals Books
Federal/State Government Depository
Census Data
Maintenance and Program Evaluation/Needs
Operation Needs Contract Management
Assessment Public Works / Capital Financing
Statistical/Data Analysis
Computer Literacy

-69-

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Local Government Information and Training Needs in the 21st Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1 Introduction to Local Government 1
  • Chapter 2 the Changing Environment of Local Government 13
  • CONCLUSIONS 36
  • Chapter 3 Training Theory and Approaches 37
  • CONCLUSIONS 53
  • Chapter 4 Current and Future Training and Assistance Needs 55
  • Note 69
  • Chapter 5 Additional Training and Assistance Needs for the Present and Future 71
  • Notes 92
  • Chapter 6 Preparing Municipalities for the Twenty-First Century 95
  • Appendix A Survey Instrument 103
  • Appendix B Illustrations of Training Modules and Activities 109
  • References 127
  • Index 137
  • About the Authors 143
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