Franklin D. Roosevelt's Rhetorical Presidency

By Halford R. Ryan | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I wish to record the help I have received along the way. My scholarly interest in Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidential rhetoric was first supported by a grant from the Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for research in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library in Hyde Park, New York. There, I examined FDR's First Inaugural Address and Fourth Inaugural Address. My findings, originally published in the Quarterly Journal of Speech in 1979 and 1981, appear in a slightly altered state in the chapter on inaugural addresses. The editors, Robert Friedman and Hermann Stelzner , respectively, and nameless referees helped me to focus my thoughts.

The chapter on FDR vs. the Supreme Court was begun as a writing project for a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar on "Rhetoric and Public Discourse," directed by Edward P. J. Corbett, Ohio State University, 1981. Corbett and the other participants, especially Lawrence Rosenfield, helped to clarify my thoughts on speeches of accusation and apology. I presented a version of the chapter on a panel I organized, "Presidential Libraries: Researching the Rhetorical Presidency," at the national convention of the Speech Communication Association, Washington, D.C., 1983. As a respondent to the panel, I wish to thank Jeffrey Auer for his suggestions on how to refine my treatment of FDR's Second Inaugural Address with respect to the Court fight.

A substantial Washington and Lee University Glenn Grant enabled me to conduct extensive research in the Roosevelt Library in 1982. The product of that research forms the core materials for this book. Under the guidance of John Elrod, dean of the College, I was granted a leave in 1987 to finish the manuscript.

My ideas on rhetorical revisionism were presented for a panel on "Studies on FDR: In Memory of Leroy W. Copperthwaite," Central States Speech Com

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Franklin D. Roosevelt's Rhetorical Presidency
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • 1 - Franklin D. Roosevelt as a Rhetorical President 1
  • 2 - Roosevelt's Persuasive Delivery 13
  • 3 - FDR and the Media: Radio, Newsreels, and Press 25
  • 4 - Four Campaigns to the People 39
  • 5 - Inaugurating the Presidency 75
  • 6 - Roosevelt Vs. the Supreme Court 109
  • 7 - A War of Words and Words of War: the Purge and the Isolationists 131
  • 8 - Writing the Rhetoric 161
  • Appendix - Chronology of Fireside Chats 169
  • Notes 171
  • Bibliography 187
  • Speech Index 199
  • Subject Index 203
  • About the Author 207
  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science 208
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