International Organizations and Environmental Policy

By Robert V. Bartlett; Priya A. Kurian et al. | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION

Like ecologically irrational social structures, systems of thought also perpetuate themselves. In a world of already existing paradigms, new research and new agendas for theory and practice can flounder. Institutional and systemic barriers exist. But these aside, the practical difficulties posed by scarce funding for research on IOs cramp anything but the most modest of research agendas. To begin to understand the organizational complexities of even one international organization calls for a significant investment of funds. Whereas national agencies have been studied in depth because of their perceived importance to the domestic policy-making process, the same is not true for IOs. Furthermore, few people can straddle both worlds--of academia and the practitioner world of the IOs. Thus, the valuable experience of IO officials rarely finds translation into critical analyses of the functioning of the organizations.

But if politics and institutions must adapt and change to grapple better with the environmental problematique, research and practice must address the centrality of ecological rationality. A shift in values, politics, and institutions--a move away from the self-perpetuation of old paradigms--may indeed be a perilous process. Yet, "the sport, it seems . . . is worth the candle" ( Stone, 1988:310). The aspiration for ecological rationality--indeed even sustainable development despite its many flaws--drives our policy vision of a greener, better world.


NOTES

We thank Lynton K. Caldwell and Stefanie Rixecker for helpful comments on earlier versions of this chapter.

1.
Soroos defines problematique as "an interrelated group of problems that cannot be effectively addressed apart from one another" ( 1993:318). Ophuls and Boyan define it as "an ensemble of problems and their interactions" ( 1992: 43).
2.
Diesing identifies three phases or aspects of rationality ( 1962:3-4). Substantial rationality applies to individual decisions: "A decision or action is substantially rational when it takes account of the possibilities and limitations of a given situation and reorganizes it so as to produce, or increase, or preserve, some good." Functional rationality is characteristic of organizations that are structured "to produce, or increase, or preserve, some good in a consistent, dependable fashion." Principles of order underlie all concepts of rationality: "Decisions are made according to principles, and organized structures embody principles of order."
3.
For a thorough exploration of these five rationalities, see Diesing, 1962.
4.
The international system is not, of course, the only commonality IOs share. Ernst Haas points out that all IOs are faced with "situational constants" such as the unequal

-16-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Organizations and Environmental Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.