The National Government and Social Welfare: What Should Be the Federal Role?

By John E. Hansan; Robert Morris | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
Housing: Reconstructing the Federal Government's Role and Responsibilities

Michael E. Stoneand Chester Hartman


OCTOBER 1996: THE CONTEXT OF FEDERAL HOUSING POLICY

On the sixtieth anniversary of the passage of the United States Housing Act of 1937, this fundamental federal framework for low- and moderate- income housing is in danger of being repealed by Congress. The housing bill President Clinton signed in September 1996 calls for no increase whatever in the number of government-subsidized housing units. 1 Hundreds of thousands of units of public housing are slated for demolition without replacement; hundreds of thousands of units in privately developed and owned "expiring use" projects are no longer required to be subsidized for lower-income people; and hundreds of thousands of tenant-based rental certificates and vouchers are facing contract expiration without certainty of renewal. A recent "New York Times" report on federal housing policy concluded: "The federal government has essentially conceded defeat in its decades-long drive to make housing affordable to low-income Americans" ( DeParle 1996).

These attacks and cutbacks are, of course, a substantial piece of the larger assault on federal social-welfare policies, but they also have their own character and context. Since the early 1980s, federal housing programs for low- and moderate-income people have been subjected to relentless ideological attack. Furthermore, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development was subjected to scandalous and cynical abuse by Reagan appointees and cronies, from which it has never fully recovered ( Dreier and

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The National Government and Social Welfare: What Should Be the Federal Role?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.