The National Government and Social Welfare: What Should Be the Federal Role?

By John E. Hansan; Robert Morris | Go to book overview

Chapter 12
Federal Role in Establishing National Income Security for Children

Martha N. Ozawa

The federal government is confronted with a great challenge: to cut expenditures for welfare programs while investing more public resources in the nation's children. Such investment is necessary if the country is to have a future workforce with the skills necessary to compete in the global economy and to support the impending retirees of the baby-boom generation, each of whom will have only two workers to support them instead of the current three ( Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance Trust Funds 1995). How the United States can meet this challenge and what the federal government's role should be are crucial issues to address.

The government's push to cut expenditures for welfare programs is in response to negative public attitudes toward welfare families, which are compounded by the fact that, increasingly, women are becoming dependent on welfare because they give birth out of wedlock as teenagers. In 1991, as many as 53 percent of the children on Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) had mothers who had never been married, as compared with 32 percent in 1973 ( House 1993, 696). Of the $47.27 billion that were spent on all AFDC families in 1990-including AFDC, Medicaid, and food stamps--an estimated $25.05 billion (or 52 percent) were spent on AFDC families whose dependence was the result of teenage pregnancy and childbirth. The annual public expenditures to support each such family increased from $13,902 per year in 1985 to $28,123 per year in 1990, in 1990 dollars ( House 1993, 1148).

Responding to the public's apprehension about welfare programs and their beneficiaries, Republicans proceeded to implement the Contract with

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The National Government and Social Welfare: What Should Be the Federal Role?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 202

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.