Judgment and Decision Making: Neo-Brunswikian and Process-Tracing Approaches

By Peter Juslin; Henry Montgomery | Go to book overview

of difficulties that participants in microworld experiments would experience only too soon. Unlike the advocates of classical decision theory, however, researchers within the paradigm of dynamic decision making have not interpreted the failure of their participants as "errors" or "biases" according to some arbitrarily chosen norm. Instead, the performance and behavior of the participants in microworld experiments have been evaluated in close connection to the demands that each such microworld has raised. As a consequence, this approach has resulted in two things. First, a number of decision or complex solving behaviors have been examined and described in detail, some of which have been shown to be adaptive decision strategies, whereas others have been interpreted as maladaptive behaviors. Second, the participants' performances have revealed in detail a number of task characteristics with which people have severe problems.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The research reported in this chapter was supported by grants from the Swedish Council for Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences.


REFERENCES

Badke-Schaub P. ( 1989). How people try to solve the AIDS-problem. Decision making in complex situations: Results of a simulation experiment. Memorandum 75, Lehrstuhl Psychologie II, Bamberg University.

Bainbridge L. ( 1981). Mathematical equations or processing routines? In. J. Rasmussen & W. B. Rouse (Eds.), Human detection and diagnosis of systems failures. New York: Plenum.

Björkman M. ( 1984). "Decision making, risk taking and psychological time: Review of empirical findings and psychological theory". Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 25, 31-49.

Brehmer B. ( 1984). Brunswikian psychology for the 1990s. In P. Niemi & K. Lagerspetz (Eds.), Psychology in the 1990s. Amsterdam: North-Holland.

Brehmer B. ( 1990a). Towards a taxonomy for microworlds. In. J. Rasmussen, B. Brehmer, M. De Montmollin, & J. Leplat (Eds.), Taxonomy for analysis of work domains. Proceedings of the first MOHAWC workshop, Roskilde, Risö National Laboratory.

Brehmer B. ( 1990b). Strategies in real-time, dynamic decision making. In R. Hogarth (Ed.), Insights in decision making. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Brehmer B. ( 1992). "Dynamic decision making: Human control of complex systems". Acta Psychologica, 81, 211-241.

Brehmer B., & Dörner D. ( 1993). Research with computer simulated microworlds: Escaping the narrow straits of the laboratory as well as the deep blue sea of the field study. Computers in Human Behavior, 9, 171-184.

Brehmer B., & Jansson A. ( 1993). Swedes in MORO: I. Effects of goal specificity. Unpublished manuscript, Department of Psychology, Uppsala University.

Brunswik E. ( 1952). Conceptual framework of psychology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Conant R. C., & Ashby W. R. ( 1970). "Every good regulator of a system must be a model of that system". International Journal of System Science, 1, 89-97.

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