Children with Handicaps: A Review of Behavioral Research

By Gershon Berkson | Go to book overview

7
Intelligence, Play, and Language

A central assumption in this book has been that adaptation is the main focus when considering the psychology of children with handicaps. We turn now to the most human of adaptations, the varied and complex processes that we call intelligence, play, and language. If one wishes, it would be easy to start an argument about the definition of intelligence. Is intelligence a general characteristic of which people have a lot or a little? Is it one or more special abilities or talents? Or is it only what intelligence tests measure? In this chapter, we show that intelligence is all of these and much more.

Like most other general psychological concepts, such as emotions, perception, social behavior, and psychotherapy, intelligence is a very general idea having many facets, levels, and applications. It is true that one can characterize a person's general intelligence with a single number, the IQ score. However, this does not mean that the score completely characterizes the person's thinking. Although the IQ score is a pretty good predictor of children's success in school, it does not do as well in predicting their income and the likelihood that they will have friends. Moreover, the general IQ score does not predict specific delays in academic performance such as those seen in children with learning disabilities who have normal intelligence but who have specific problems in reading or arithmetic. Nor does it account for special talents in music, chess-playing, and mathematics that are found in otherwise normal, or even mentally retarded, people.

Perhaps most important, even when the IQ score predicts academic

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Children with Handicaps: A Review of Behavioral Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • I - General Issues 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Categories and Prevalence 41
  • 3 - Causes of Developmental Disorders 69
  • 4 - Identification and Diagnosis 105
  • II - Individual Psychology 127
  • 5 - Sensorimotor Processes 129
  • 6 - Attention, Learning, and Memory 149
  • 7 - Intelligence, Play, and Language 173
  • 8 - Motivation and Personality 205
  • III - Social Psychology 229
  • 9 - Social Interactions 231
  • 10 - Educational Programs and Treatment Methods 269
  • 11 - Life in Adulthood 314
  • References 337
  • Author Index 439
  • Subject Index 475
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 479

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.