Sensory Research: Multimodal Perspectives

By Ronald T. Verrillo; Jozef J. Zwislocki | Go to book overview

Sensory Research Multimodal Perspectives

Edited by Ronald T. Verrillo

Institute for Sensory Research, Syracuse University

LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOCIATES, PUBLISHERS

1993 Hillsdale, New Jersey Hove and London

-iii-

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Sensory Research: Multimodal Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Tribute xvii
  • List of Contributors xxiii
  • Introduction xxvii
  • 1: Can Magnitude Scaling Reveal the Growth of Loudness in Cochlear Impairment? 1
  • Introduction 1
  • SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS 15
  • Acknowledgments 16
  • References 17
  • 2: Control of Rhythmic Firing in Aplysia Neuron R15: A Calcium Riddle 19
  • 2: Control of Rhythmic Firing in Aplysia Neuron R15 19
  • Introduction 33
  • 3: Adaptation and Dynamic Responses in the Auditory Periphery 35
  • Introduction 35
  • CONCLUSIONS 49
  • Acknowledgments 50
  • References 50
  • 4: Intensity Coding and Circadian Rhythms in the Limulus Lateral Eye 55
  • References 71
  • 5: The Influence of Long-Range Spatial Interactions on Human Contrast Perception 75
  • Introduction 75
  • GENERAL CONCLUSIONS 89
  • References 90
  • 6: Cochlear Potentials in Quiet-Aged Gerbils: Does the Aging Cochlea Need a Jump Start? 91
  • Introduction 91
  • References 101
  • References 102
  • 7: Photoreceptors, Black Smokers, and Seasonal Affective Disorder: Evidence for Photostasis 105
  • Introduction 105
  • Acknowledgments 116
  • References 116
  • 8: And Now, for Our Two Senses 119
  • Introduction 119
  • Acknowledgments 135
  • References 136
  • 9: Interaural Temporal Coding of Complex High-Frequency Sounds: A Transformation in the Inferior Colliculus? 141
  • Acknowledgments 148
  • References 148
  • 10: Differential Abilities to Extract Sound-Envelope Information by Auditory Nerve and Cochlear Nucleus Neurons 151
  • Introduction 151
  • Conclusion 172
  • Acknowledgments 172
  • References 172
  • 11: Representing the Surface Texture of Grooved Plates Using Single-Channel, Electrocutaneous Stimulation 177
  • Introduction 177
  • CONCLUSIONS 194
  • References 195
  • 12: Loudness Evaluation by Subjects and by a Loudness Meter 199
  • Introduction 199
  • Conclusion 208
  • Acknowledgments 209
  • References 209
  • 13: What is Absolute About Absolute Magnitude Estimation? 211
  • Introduction 211
  • Acknowledgments 229
  • References 229
  • 14: Involvement of Different Isoforms of Actin in Outer Hair-Cell Motility 233
  • Introduction 233
  • References 247
  • 15: Physiology and Functional Implications of a Unique Vertebrate Visual System 249
  • Introduction 249
  • References 261
  • 16: Process and Mechanism: Mechanoreceptors in the Mouth as the Primary Modulators of Rhythmic Behavior in Feeding? 263
  • Introduction 263
  • Acknowledgments 280
  • References 281
  • 17: The Effects of Aging on the Sense of Touch 285
  • Introduction 285
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT 297
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT 297
  • References 297
  • 18: Does Efferent Input Improve the Detection of Tones in Monaural Noise? 299
  • Introduction 299
  • Acknowledgments 305
  • References 306
  • Author Index 307
  • Subject Index 317
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