The Biological Foundations of Gestures: Motor and Semiotic Aspects

By Jean-Luc Nespoulous; Paul Perron et al. | Go to book overview
or somato-sensory deficit, one of them is ambidextrous and the other is left- handed. We might add that the three doctors (observed by means of a second camera) often make gestures with their left hands though none of them is left- handed!

CONCLUSION
The functional analysis of gestures and mimics points to their obvious ambiguities. One has to adopt different levels of interpretation.Two hypotheses should be considered. Either the aphasic can compensate for his verbal deficit thanks to a preserved mimogestuality, or the deficit is global and involves the verbal and the nonverbal production. There is no simple answer. Clearly, we have to consider both the type of gesture and the particular patient studied.An ethological approach, taking into account the patient as a whole, demonstrates that the gestural deficit in most cases is not as serious as the VERBAL deficit. Thanks to nonverbal communication, patients can act upon their interlocutors by expressing their feelings and emotions, and situating themselves with respect to verbal speech. However, they rarely use gestures to transmit information with referential functions.Using verbal fluency as the sole criterion in classifying aphasia does not account for the fact that speech is only one aspect of communication. Communication can be effective without speech. Indeed, some of the patients compensate for their verbal deficit by using mimics and gestures. For some of them, a paradigmatic choice is possible. The analysis of the gestures and mimics of these six patients observed in several communication situations led us to believe that the aphasic's mimogestuality should be analyzed according to three criteria:
the function of the gestures in a communicating situation,
the patient's personality.
whether or not praxic disorders are present.

Speech and mimogestuality cannot be dissociated. The aphasic's expression and comprehension capabilities must be analyzed in relation to the communication situation. These fundamental remarks should be applied to the therapeutic approach taken for each patient. Language is produced through interaction between the locutors; speaking is not merely responding to a series of exercises which test linguistic competence. Communication is partly due to verbal exchange and partly due to mimogestuality.

The language assessment of an aphasic patient by a doctor is one particular communication situation in which their roles are defined, but it could be made more natural if nonverbal elements accompanying or replacing speech were

-307-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Biological Foundations of Gestures: Motor and Semiotic Aspects
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.