The Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion

By Ford Madox Ford; Thomas C. Moser | Go to book overview

NOTE ON THE TEXT

1

THE only two complete manuscripts of The Good Soldier are housed at Cornell University Library. The first is some 376 pages of holograph and typescript; the second, which consists Of 305 typed pages, is the printer's copy. The portions of the first manuscript which are in holograph were written by three different people: most of Part I ( MS pages 2-44 and 47-82) was written by Brigit Patmore; much of Part III ( MS pages 141-96, 206-18, and 225-53) appears to have been written by the American Imagist poet H. D. ( Hilda Doolittle); the last two chapters, less the first two, typed pages ( MS pages 342-76) look to be in the hand of H. D.'s husband, the English Imagist poet Richard Aldington. In It Was the Nightingale, Ford pays ironic tribute to H. D. and Aldington: 'When I was dictating the most tragic portion of my most tragic book to an American poetess she fainted several times. One morning she fainted three times. So I had to call in her husband to finish the last pages of the book. He did not faint' (pp. 220-1).

The holograph portions of the manuscript surely represent first drafts; the typed portions may or may not be. (Theoretically, the first draft of the novel could have been wholly handwritten by secretaries, with large swatches so completely rewritten that long holograph portions were simply discarded for typed, second-draft pages. The appearance of the manuscript does not, however, suggest this.) In any case, some of Ford's revisions and excisions in the first manuscript are quite interesting.

Not surprisingly, changes occur with greatest frequency in the early pages where Ford is still feeling his way into the book. Some of the changes are relatively minor--the slight but unerring revisions of the highly experienced professional:

-xxviii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents v
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vi
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxviii
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY xxxvii
  • CHRONOLOGY OF FORD MADOX FORD xl
  • DEDICATORY LETTER TO STELLA FORD 1
  • Title Page 5
  • I 7
  • II 17
  • III 27
  • IV 42
  • V 56
  • VI 80
  • PART II 89
  • I 91
  • II 114
  • PART III 121
  • I 123
  • II 145
  • III 158
  • IV 177
  • V 192
  • PART IV 211
  • II 227
  • III 250
  • IV 262
  • V 268
  • VI 280
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 295
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.