The Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion

By Ford Madox Ford; Thomas C. Moser | Go to book overview

III

AND then Leonora completely broke down--on the day that they returned to Branshaw Teleragh. It is the infliction of our miserable minds--it is the scourge of atrocious but probably just destiny that no grief comes by itself. No, any great grief, though the grief itself may have gone, leaves in its place a train of horrors, of misery, and despair. For Leonora was, in herself, relieved. She felt that she could trust Edward with the girl and she knew that Nancy could be absolutely trusted. And then, with the slackening of her vigilance, came the slackening of her entire mind. This is perhaps the most miserable part of the entire story. For it is miserable to see a clear intelligence waver; and Leonora wavered.

You are to understand that Leonora loved Edward with a passion that was yet like an agony of hatred. And she had lived with him for years and years without addressing to him one word of tenderness. I don't know how she could do it. At the beginning of that relationship she had been just married off to him. She had been one of seven daughters in a bare, untidy Irish manor house to which she had returned from the convent I have so often spoken of. She had left it just a year and she was just nineteen. It is impossible to imagine such inexperience as was hers. You might almost say that she had never spoken to a man except

-158-

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The Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents v
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vi
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxviii
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY xxxvii
  • CHRONOLOGY OF FORD MADOX FORD xl
  • DEDICATORY LETTER TO STELLA FORD 1
  • Title Page 5
  • I 7
  • II 17
  • III 27
  • IV 42
  • V 56
  • VI 80
  • PART II 89
  • I 91
  • II 114
  • PART III 121
  • I 123
  • II 145
  • III 158
  • IV 177
  • V 192
  • PART IV 211
  • II 227
  • III 250
  • IV 262
  • V 268
  • VI 280
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 295
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