The Search for Quality Integrated Education: Policy and Research on Minority Students in School and College

By Meyer Weinberg | Go to book overview

12
Minorities In Higher
Education--II

North Carolina Studies

A small number of studies of black students in colleges in North Carolina have been made and are reported below.

Recently, Augustus Burns traced the history of efforts by state officials in North Carolina to exclude blacks from public graduate and professional education in the years 1930-1951. 1"Many of the state's leaders," he wrote, "were strong believers in racial segregation, and they waged the legal fight against desegregation as a matter of conscience."2 The officials also sought to protect the state university's flagship campus at Chapel Hill from voluntary desegregation. When legal segregation appeared to be doomed, state officials continued to fight in the courts in order to place the onus for desegregation on federal officials.

Cleon Thompson made a comparison of black and white public higher education institutions in the state. Wherever possible he used data within the period of 1964-1974; in those years, white enrollment almost tripled while that of the black colleges rose by only about two-thirds. 3 In 1964, both types of institutions enrolled fewer than 1 percent of opposite-race students. By 1974, whites made up 7.4 percent of enrollment at predominantly black institutions while blacks constituted only 3.1 percent of enrollment at predominantly white institutions. The percentage of freshmen graduating with a baccalaureate four years later (in 1966) was 47.2 in black institutions and 43.5 in white institutions. Eight years later the black percentage was 74.9 but the white percentage was 86.7. During this latter span of years, blacks advanced but lost in relative standing.

Thompson used another measurement, "Advanced to next level," a measure of whether students were progressing normally. Blacks in black schools progressed at somewhat higher rates than did blacks in white schools. In 1974-1975, black students in black schools persisted at a higher rate than did white students in white schools (68.8 percent v. 60.8 percent). The following year, however, the rates were virtually identical (59.6 percent v. 59. 1). During the same two years, retention rates--that is, the number of

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The Search for Quality Integrated Education: Policy and Research on Minority Students in School and College
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - The Historical Background 1
  • Notes 20
  • 2 - The Legal Framework 23
  • Notes 50
  • 3 - Race And. Intelligence in America 54
  • Notes 85
  • 4 - Changing Discriminatory Educational Processes 94
  • Notes 109
  • 5 - Education in Black Schools 112
  • 6 - Intradistrict Inequalities 127
  • Notes 143
  • 7 - Desegregation and Academic Achievement 146
  • Notes 168
  • 8 - Moving from Desegregation to Integration 172
  • Notes 189
  • 9 - Mexican Americans and American Indians 194
  • Notes 226
  • 10 - The Minority Community and Its Schools 231
  • 11 - Minorities in Higher Education - I 270
  • Notes 290
  • 12 - Minorities in Higher Education--Ii 294
  • 13 - Conclusions 324
  • Bibliographical Essay 333
  • Index 343
  • About the Author 355
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