The Search for Quality Integrated Education: Policy and Research on Minority Students in School and College

By Meyer Weinberg | Go to book overview

13
Conclusions

Research on minority students has undergone significant changes during the past decade or so.

More studies are being made from the viewpoint of minority parents or students rather than from that of administrators or teachers. In this changed perspective, the school loses much of its beneficent penumbra and its educational contribution becomes much more problematical. The advent of minority researchers has had much to do with this change, although neither the race nor the ethnicity of the researcher wholly accounts for it.

In the foregoing chapters we have seen evidences of this change in research perspectives in the spheres of legal affairs, discriminatory classroom procedures, and higher education, as well as in others. We are in the early stages of the change. Consequently, few general treatises and textbooks used to train future teachers, administrators, and researchers pay much attention to the viewpoint of parents. Indeed, there is a certain defensiveness in the reluctance of schools of education to depart from the customary bureaucratic framework for viewing problems of schooling.

Another change, closely allied with the first, concerns explanatory schemes or theories. Many of these still echo the writings of the 1960S when children of a minority race or low economic status were held responsible for failures of schooling. They were regarded as "different," "culturally deprived," or precluded from learning because of home or family conditions. This left the more privileged children as the most successful, a condition deemed natural by most writers on the subject.

Recently, however, some researchers have begun to view the schools as responsible for the basic educational task. Although they regard the schools as actively choosing to adapt themselves to the class and racial structure of society, these researchers still insist on the possibility of change. They see society's tendency to press the schools into a constrictive role for poor and minority children as being subject to change under organized community pressure by parents. Merely to exhort administrators to effect this change is not considered a very productive course. The studies of parent influence on

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The Search for Quality Integrated Education: Policy and Research on Minority Students in School and College
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - The Historical Background 1
  • Notes 20
  • 2 - The Legal Framework 23
  • Notes 50
  • 3 - Race And. Intelligence in America 54
  • Notes 85
  • 4 - Changing Discriminatory Educational Processes 94
  • Notes 109
  • 5 - Education in Black Schools 112
  • 6 - Intradistrict Inequalities 127
  • Notes 143
  • 7 - Desegregation and Academic Achievement 146
  • Notes 168
  • 8 - Moving from Desegregation to Integration 172
  • Notes 189
  • 9 - Mexican Americans and American Indians 194
  • Notes 226
  • 10 - The Minority Community and Its Schools 231
  • 11 - Minorities in Higher Education - I 270
  • Notes 290
  • 12 - Minorities in Higher Education--Ii 294
  • 13 - Conclusions 324
  • Bibliographical Essay 333
  • Index 343
  • About the Author 355
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