P. G. T. Beauregard: Napoleon in Gray

By T. Harry Williams | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
The Halls of Montezuma

W HILE LIEUTENANT BEAUREGARD fretfully dreamed of martial glory the war he had been waiting for started. In May, 1846, the tense relations between the United States and Mexico snapped into open war. Immediately after the news of the declaration of war had been received in New Orleans, Beauregard renewed his application to be sent to General Taylor's headquarters as an engineer officer. Almost frenzied by excitement, he feared that the war would be over before he could get in.1 He was disappointed in his hope of securingan immediate assignment, and he was wrong in thinking that the United States could defeat Mexico in one short campaign. At the beginning -- of the Mexican War, the only sizable American army in the field was Taylor's so-called Army of Occupation on the northern bank of the Rio Grande. Taylor and President James K. Polk thought that if the army advanced into Mexico and occupied a part of the country the Mexican government would make peace on American terms. Accordingly Taylor crossed the Rio Grande, defeated the Mexicans in several engagements, and seized a triangle of territory in northeastern Mexico. To the surprise of the naive planners of the American high command, the Mexicans were not disheartened by their reverses and gave no indication that they were going to quit the war.

Among the points seized by the Americans was the port city of Tampico on the eastern coast, which was used as a base through which to funnel supplies to Taylor's army. To protect Tampico against the unlikely event of a Mexican attack, the Engineer Department had started to construct fortifications around it on the land side. Now Colonel Totten remembered Beauregard's applications for service and his reputation as a fort builder. Late in November the

____________________
1
Beauregard to Totten, May 14, 1846, in Beauregard Papers ( Library of Congress), Letterbook 1.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
P. G. T. Beauregard: Napoleon in Gray
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Maps xiii
  • Chapter One - The Creole 1
  • Chapter Two - The Halls of Montezuma 13
  • Chapter Three 34
  • Chapter F Our - The Guns of Sumter 51
  • Chapter Five - Napoleonic Planning at Manassas 66
  • Chapter Seven - Pity for Those in High Authority 96
  • Chapter Eight - With Albert Sidney Johnston 113
  • Chapter Nine - Shiloh 133
  • Chapter Ten 150
  • Chapter Eleven - Return to Charleston 166
  • Chapter Twelve - The Big Bombardment 185
  • Chapter Thirteen - Return to Virginia 197
  • Chapter Fourteen - On The Petersburg Line 212
  • Chapter Fifteen - Commander of the West 236
  • Chapter Sixteen - Reconstruction 257
  • Chapter Seventeen - Painting the Monkey's Tail 273
  • Chapter Eighteen - The Louisiana Lottery 291
  • Chapter Nineteen - Ghosts and Ghostwriters 304
  • Chapter Twenty - Death of a Hero 319
  • Critical Essay on Authorities 330
  • Index 339
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.