P. G. T. Beauregard: Napoleon in Gray

By T. Harry Williams | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
With Albert Sidney Johnston

O NE DAY late in January Roger A. Pryor, one of Beauregard's supporters in Congress and a member of the military affairs committee, came to Centreville. He told Beauregard that the committee and the representatives of the Mississippi Valley states had delegated him to approach the general about transferring to the Western theater. The President, Pryor assured, had agreed to the change. Pryor explained that Beauregard would serve under Albert Sidney Johnston, departmental commander in the West, and would command the left wing of Johnston's forces in Kentucky with headquarters at Columbus on the Mississippi. The situation in the West was critical, Pryor added, and Beauregard's presence would stimulate popular morale.1

Although Beauregard claimed after the war that he discouraged Pryor, actually he seems to have been receptive to the: offer from the first. The proposed assignment promised more active service and would remove him from the close supervision of Richmond. Any reluctance he expressed was for the purpose of wringing certain concessions from the administration as the price of his departure. He was particularly anxious to avoid giving, the impression that he was being forced to leave Virginia against his will. He told Pryor that he would go if these conditions were met: the Western army would be increased to the point where it could start an offensive; he could take with him his staff and a number of experienced officers; and he could return to Virginia when his work in the West was finished. Pryor said that he was not authorized to endorse these demands but he would consult with the War Department. From Richmond he telegraphed vaguely that he was sure Davis would consent to all of Beauregard's wishes.2

When Beauregard's political friends heard of the negotiations,

____________________
1
Roman, Beauregard, I, 210-11.
2
Ibid., 211-12.

-113-

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P. G. T. Beauregard: Napoleon in Gray
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Maps xiii
  • Chapter One - The Creole 1
  • Chapter Two - The Halls of Montezuma 13
  • Chapter Three 34
  • Chapter F Our - The Guns of Sumter 51
  • Chapter Five - Napoleonic Planning at Manassas 66
  • Chapter Seven - Pity for Those in High Authority 96
  • Chapter Eight - With Albert Sidney Johnston 113
  • Chapter Nine - Shiloh 133
  • Chapter Ten 150
  • Chapter Eleven - Return to Charleston 166
  • Chapter Twelve - The Big Bombardment 185
  • Chapter Thirteen - Return to Virginia 197
  • Chapter Fourteen - On The Petersburg Line 212
  • Chapter Fifteen - Commander of the West 236
  • Chapter Sixteen - Reconstruction 257
  • Chapter Seventeen - Painting the Monkey's Tail 273
  • Chapter Eighteen - The Louisiana Lottery 291
  • Chapter Nineteen - Ghosts and Ghostwriters 304
  • Chapter Twenty - Death of a Hero 319
  • Critical Essay on Authorities 330
  • Index 339
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