The Political World of American Zionism

By Samuel Halperin | Go to book overview

appendix I
SOME NATIONAL AMERICAN JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS

Sources: American Jewish Year Books, XXXI ( 1929), XLVII( 1945-46),and Palestine Yearbook, I( 1944-45), IV ( 1948-49).

Note: Membership figures listed are unverified claims of the organizations themselves.


A.General Programs (not primarily pro-Palestine functions)
NAME FOUNDED MEMBERSHIP
1930 1945
Agudas Israel 1941 -- 29,450
American Birobidjan Committee 1934 -- 5,000
American Council for Judaism 1942 -- --
American Jewish Committee 1906 -- 450 corporate members
American Jewish Conference 1943 -- 120 delegates of 64 na-
tional organizations;
378 delegates of local
communities
American Jewish Congress 1917, 1922 -- --
American Joint Distribution
Committee
1914 -- --
Assembly of Hebrew Orthodox
Rabbis of U.S. and Canada
1920 -- 125
B'nai B'rith, Order of 1843 85,000 200,000 in world
c. 150,000 in US
Central Conference of American
Rabbis (Reform)
1899 268 475
Council of Jewish Federations
and Welfare funds
1932 -- 263 councils in
231 cities
Federation of Orthodox Rabbis
of America
1926 102 --
Free Sons of Israel 1849 8,468 10,056
Independent Order B'rith Abraham 1887 110,000 58,000
Independent Order B'rith Shalom 1905 23,676 14,623
Jewish-American Section, Interna-
tional Workers Order (Jewish
People's Fraternal Order)
1930 -- 47,000
Jewish Labor Committee 1934 -- --
Jewish National Workers' Alliance 1912 5,933 25,000
Jewish Reconstructionist Founda-
tion
1935 -- 500
Jewish War Veterans of the United
States
1896 8,000 65,000
National Council of Jewish Women 1893 -- 65,000

-317-

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