Blackcoats among the Delaware: David Zeisberger on the Ohio Frontier

By Earl P. Olmstead | Go to book overview

Burials 1-44, 1799-1823

1799

Burial 1

Benjamin, son of William and Rachel Henry

Goshen diary, August 11 and 12, 1799:

11th,

Early in the morning Benjamin departed this life. Bro. Zeisberger preached from I Tim. 1:15. . . .

12th,

The brn. [Brethren] cleared a pleasant & elevated spot of land for a burying- ground and opened a road to it. At 3 O'clock, after a funeral discourse in the church to about 50 persons, which was held upon the W.W. [watchword] of yesterday, concerning the happy lot of those who are called home to our Saviour; the congregation went there in procession; when Zeisberger in a fervent prayer solemnly dedicated this newly laid out place of interment to be a depository for the bodies of our departed brn. & sis., till the last trumpet shall call them forth at the general resurrection. Afterwards, the remains of our br. [brother] Benjamin, as the first fruits of the Goshen congn. [congregation] which has been transplanted into the church triumphant, were interred, during the prayer of the usual litany. ( MCA B171/F4: 12-13)

The eighteen-year-old Benjamin was born on top of a hill just east of the Gnadenhutten mission in 1781. His family was fleeing from the colonial militia led by Colonel Brodhead, who had just raided and burned their village at Goschachgunk. A concern for the safety of his mother, Rachel, induced his father, Gelelemend, to secure a sheltered place for her to give birth to their child. They camped overnight near the Gnadenhutten mission, where they were safe from the militia.

In 1789, when Benjamin was eight, his parents moved to the Moravian mission at New Salem (Pettquotting) near present Milan, Ohio, on the Huron River. Here his father was baptized William Henry on

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Blackcoats among the Delaware: David Zeisberger on the Ohio Frontier
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Part I The Wilderness Years 1772-1798 1
  • One the Ambiguous Delaware 3
  • Two the Great Dispersement 34
  • Three from Disaster to a New Beginning 51
  • Four Return to the Ohio Country 64
  • Five Pettquotting the New Salem 76
  • Six from the Detroit River to the Retrenche 87
  • Part 2 The Goshen Mission Years 1798-1821 105
  • Seven the Goshen Mission 107
  • Eight Goshen Mission Life an Overview 124
  • Nine Without Their Beloved David 152
  • Part 3 Record of Burials, the Goshen Mission Cemetery 173
  • Origins of the Goshen Biographical Sketches 175
  • Burials 1-44, 1799-1823 177
  • Appendix A 241
  • Appendix B 243
  • Appendix C 244
  • Appendix D 245
  • Appendix E 246
  • Appendix F 248
  • Appendix G 249
  • Notes 255
  • Bibliography 267
  • Index 273
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