Beyond Camp David: Emerging Alignments and Leaders in the Middle East

By Paul A. Jureidini; R. D. McLaurin | Go to book overview

Actors and Forces

WITH THE RISE OF MIDDLE EAST OIL as a paramount consideration in international politics, the number of Middle East countries that can be viewed as important has grown apace. The key countries now include not only the traditional political and military powers-- Egypt, Iran, Israel, and Syria--but, as well, two states with new- found substantial weight--Saudi Arabia and Iraq. In this chapter we discuss in some detail the importance and role of each of these states and of Jordan (which is a marginal regional actor in most respects but which may play a central role in the evolution of the West Bank issue) and the principal factors governing their decision-making. The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and other states are treated more cursorily in the final part of the chapter.


EGYPT

Objectives and Interest Groups

For much of the period between 1967 and 1973, Egypt appeared to have relinquished its role as leader of the Arab world. Even during the War of Attrition, 1 Egypt's impotence seemed at least as much in evidence as its power. Indeed, it was the influx of unprecedented numbers of Soviet advisors into Egypt during and after the War of Attrition that led to renewed external interest in and concern about Egypt's direction. 2 Notwithstanding the early impression Anwar Sadat made on the world, 3 however, his policies, decisions, and actions since 1970 have once again placed Egypt in the position of leadership. By suggesting Egypt is a leader once more, we are not prejudging the outcome of Sadat's current policies. Rather, we refer to the fact that Sadat is marshalling Egypt's own not inconsiderable

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Beyond Camp David: Emerging Alignments and Leaders in the Middle East
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Actors and Forces 1
  • 2 - Bilateral, Multilateral, and Regional Pressures 27
  • 3 - Emerging Alignments 59
  • 4 - Regional Leadership Changes 75
  • 5 - U.S. Policy in the Emerging Middle East 93
  • Appendix A 105
  • Accompanying Letters 115
  • APPENDIX B Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty 121
  • Notes 157
  • Bibliography 187
  • Index 193
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