Beyond Camp David: Emerging Alignments and Leaders in the Middle East

By Paul A. Jureidini; R. D. McLaurin | Go to book overview

4
Regional Leadership Changes

Emerging and Declining National Powers

THE MAJOR POWERS IN THE MIDDLE EAST have been Egypt, Iran, Israel, and Saudi Arabia, although the elements of national power were mixed quite differently for these countries. Israel's strength has been military power and political stability; Iran's, perceived military power, political confidence, financial resources, and economic growth; Saudi Arabia's, financial power; and Egypt's, political power derived from a past role as Arab leader. As Egypt's reputation wavered, Syria moved into position as a major power in the Levant, largely on the basis of political stability and situational military power.

In the 1980s, however, new leadership trends will become clear. In the wake of the Camp David accords and developments in the Gulf changes are already evident. Egypt's regional role seems destined for a temporary decline and later resurgence, although the domestic political strength of the Egyptian government may well increase. No longer will Iran or Syria be paramount regional powers. Israel and Saudi Arabia will continue to be major factors in regional developments, although their political styles may change. Iraq is destined to play a more important regional role, particularly in the Gulf. This chapter discusses these trends and their underlying causes.


EGYPT

Egypt continues and will continue to struggle with overwhelming demographic pressures--a problem some Egyptians feel is of catastrophic magnitude. These and resulting social and economic problems dwarf the political and military threats Egypt may encounter,

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Beyond Camp David: Emerging Alignments and Leaders in the Middle East
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Actors and Forces 1
  • 2 - Bilateral, Multilateral, and Regional Pressures 27
  • 3 - Emerging Alignments 59
  • 4 - Regional Leadership Changes 75
  • 5 - U.S. Policy in the Emerging Middle East 93
  • Appendix A 105
  • Accompanying Letters 115
  • APPENDIX B Egyptian-Israeli Peace Treaty 121
  • Notes 157
  • Bibliography 187
  • Index 193
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