Power and Madness: The Logic of Nuclear Coercion

By Edward Rhodes | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I HAVE been fortunate. It has been my luck to discover that the qualities of charity, wisdom, and good counsel are, like the quality of mercy, not strain'd. Consequently, my task in acknowledging and thanking all those individuals and organizations whose support and assistance moved this project forward is a large one.

My debt to five great universities-- Princeton, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard, and Rutgers--is perhaps most obvious. Both intellectually and financially these institutions nurtured me and my research. The intellectual debt is impossible to describe adequately; the financial debt is somewhat easier to specify precisely, though the list of debentures is a long one. I must note my gratitude to Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School for its University Fellowship; to Cornell University's Peace Studies Program for its Peace Studies Fellowship; to Stanford University's Center for International Security and Arms Control for its Arms Control Fellowship; to Harvard University's Center for International Affairs for its Paul-Henri Spaak Fellowship in U.S.-European Relations; to Harvard University's Centers for International Affairs and European Studies for their Ford Program Fellowship in Western Security and European Society; to Rutgers University's Research Council for four separate research grants; and to Rutgers University for its Henry Rutgers Research Fellowship. To the various foundations whose financial support made these fellowships possible, I express my deepest thanks and my hopes that this book begins to justify their investment. In addition, I am grateful to the U.S. Arms

-ix-

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Power and Madness: The Logic of Nuclear Coercion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • INTROOUCTION 1
  • 1 - Mad and the Nuclear Deterrence Problem 19
  • 2 - Rationality and Irrationality 47
  • 3 - Coercive Power and Coercive Strategies 82
  • 4 - Credible Commitment and Modes of Commitment 107
  • 5 - Nuclear Weapons and Conflict Limitation 135
  • 6 - Doomsday Machines 155
  • 7 - Coercion and Contingently Irrational Behavior 171
  • 8 - Theory and Policy 203
  • Notes 231
  • Index 265
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