Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Hartley Coleridge; Grace Griggs Evelyn et al. | Go to book overview

ERRATUM

Page 11, Letter No. 3, addressed to Charles Lamb. The references To Mr. And Miss Lamb and to Mrs. Wordsworth would make it appear that the letter is to Wordsworth, but it is unmistakably addressed to Lamb.

The following letter to Charles Lamb (which is the only one extant from Hartley to Lamb) was written ten days after Hartley matriculated. Lamb and the Wordsworths had apparently gone up to Oxford with Hartley, to help him get established. Lamb, whose friendship with Coleridge was life-long, had from the first taken an interest in Hartley. On a visit to the Lakes in 1802 he had given Hartley several children's books; and in the years following, Hartley saw a good deal of him. Lamb, it is certain, remained an idol for Hartley; and one sees the mark of 'Carolo- Lambian' humour in Hartley Coleridge's literary work.


LETTER 3
To CHARLES LAMB, Temple, London.

Merton College, May 16, 1815.

My dear Sir

Being now tolerably established a Collegian, feeling my gown rather less burthensome, and myself less strange, I hasten to perform my promise of scribblelation, and to become my own historian. On the same day that you left Oxford, I called on my Tutor (a very pleasing, gentlemanly man) was by him examined in Homer, Xenophon, Aeschylus, Virgil, Horace, and Tully, and appearing to have learning enough to admit me member of the university, I was equipped in my academicals, and conducted to the Vice chancellor where I was matriculated. On Sunday morning I first appeared in chapel, and took possession, pro tempore, of the rooms I have at present, which belong to a Gentleman commoner, who is absent on account of his health. In the course of this week I shall enter on my own that are to be, and my postmastership together, as the present occupier of both will take his degree, and quit College. The thirds are low and the rooms though dark, sufficiently large and pleasant. I have regularly attended lecture in hall, which has been constantly in the Greek Testament or Grotius, and have had one private Lecture in Aeschylus. I have heard nothing of the lost parcel: if I can do any thing to procure the value of it, or give a chance of its being found, inform me of it by letter and I will do my best, though of my own talents for business I must speak humbly. I hope you have procured commodious lodgings, and that you had no difficulty in getting them. Is London much the same as it was when I used to run up and down the court-yard in Thornhaugh street? or should I see much alteration in place or

-11-

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