Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

do what I can for Ebony1--that is to say--A Romance in the first person, setting forth the manifest disadvantages of Ugliness, as an introduction to a series of Essays on divers subjects, my signature Caliban. I am sorry for Mrs. Gillman's illness, and for the cause of it--but such things are. Loves as a matter of course--can't expatiate for want of room. Hang Wrangham!

I hope you are satisfied as to [my] indignation, for to tell the truth, towards the end I got into a bit of a passion--But after all I have not libelled them as they have libelled me.

Yours,
H.C.


LETTER 13
To the REVEREND THE PROVOST AND FELLOWS OF ORIEL COLLEGE.

This letter, which is in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's handwriting, was composed for Hartley, in answer to the charges contained in Dr. Copleston's Memorandum. Cf. Appendix, B.

[Between October 15 and 19, 1820.]

Reverend Sirs

The regular time for the 'confirmation of the probationary Fellowships having arrived, and it having been announced both to myself and to my Father that it is the determination of the Provost and Resident Fellows to negative the election in my instance, and it being in the highest degree probable that their suffrages together with the grounds and motives for the same will determine the suffrages of the Fellows non- resident; I take this means of laying before the Provost and Fellows officially assembled the following declarations and avowals. And first, I declare that I do not protest against the measure itself, severe in itself and heavy in reference to its certain and probable effects as it is, and the more so from its being almost an unprecedented measure. On the contrary as far as the decision that during my probationary year I have by sundry irregularities, omissions or careless performance of the duties imposed on me by my situation as probationary Fellow; or by social preferences incongruous with the object which as a Competitor for a Fellowship of

____________________
1
William Blackwood, of Blackwood's Magazine, had recently urged Coleridge to contribute to that work; and apparently Coleridge wished his son to prepare something for publication.

-44-

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