Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

debt to me, which would have been as well. Prometheus prospers. Mrs. Gillman apologizes. Daddy sends love--so do half a dozen folk. Haven't time to ask him tho--

Remain, etc.

Write when you can
That's a good, little man,
Let me know all about you
Altho' the world flout you--
Be a good boy--
And read about Troy.
[No signature.]


LETTER 19 TO DERWENT COLERMGE, ESQRE., St. John's College, Cambridge.

[Postmark, May 2, 1821.]

Dear Derwent

I have now by me a close written letter of 31 sides intended for you, and replete with Criticism, Politics, and Senti. ments. But as it so happen'd, that this same close written epistle (which begins by the way with an Eulogium on my own punctuality) was not sent off as soon as finish'd, being delay'd on account of some promised communication from Bob1--and as I have since seen your letter to Papa, which I consider in measure as to me also, I think it eligible to let the Criticism, Politics, and Sentiments rest for the present, and take into immediate consideration your wish to change your College. Nothing can be more highly creditable to you than the spirit of your letter. It states the plain truth without disguise and without exaggeration. I will comment upon it at some length, that you may have no want of my experience in forming your determination.

Your objections to St. John's seem to fall under two heads: your small chance of success there, and your dislike to the Society. With respect to the first, I have little to say. The Fellowship, or any Fellowship, is not worth the sacrifice of health or intellectual vigour, and I am sure that you will never scruple any other sacrifice, consistent with your duty. To assume a little of the Mentor, I certainly do not think that the mere laying aside of Classics for a time, in order to obtain a definite object, ought to weigh against the advantages of

____________________
1
Robert Jameson, an Ambleside school friend.

-59-

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