Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

harshly to any part of my conduct, do not say much in my defense; his kind feelings soon return if his pride is suffer'd to slumber. Mother and Sara past thro' here and stay'd three days this week. Sara is well and the same sweet sylph as ever. Mother is, God bless her, not much more Jobish. Do write, to them, comfortably. I will forthwith concoct an article for your magazine,1 tho' I would advise you, for appearance sake, not to do much for it till you have taken your degree. 2 John Wordsworth is arrived from Oxford. I spend part of the vacation at Rydal Mount. W. has been in Holland. John is laborious as an Ass. Dora is a sweet, good humour'd girl. Little Will is a bore. Fanny White is gone into Scotland. I am deem'd heretical for admiring her more than some others, but I think myself the best judge. I have taken lodgings at the house where Mr. Moy's old house [sic] --52 Guineas a year, board and washing included. The Dixons have moved from old Brathay to Field Head, a wilderness of a place for Mrs. D. and Eliza, who are great favourites of mine. Miss Marshall--George Crump's inamorato--has run away with a strolling player--a pity--but no wonder. A fine feast for the he and she tabbies of this most benevolent neighbourhood. Elizabeth Crump is staying with the W's. She is a kind-hearted young woman, but a little too apt to put on airs which only become a beauty of 16. Mr. Dawes is at [. . . ? . . . ] All the young ladies would send their love to you, but it's too much trouble to ask. Give my love to Edwin.

[No signature.]


LETTER 26
To SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE, Highgate, Near London.

Ambleside, March 12, 1824.

My dear Father

Trusting to your liberal, and biblical commentator-like interpretation of the term 'week' I hope you will not think it necessary that I should begin this letter in the customary apologetic form--otherwise, I might save my own character for punctuality--such as it is--by antedating this epistle a few days, to bring it within the term specified in my last to dear Mrs. Gillman. However, notwithstanding my imputed

____________________
1
This was Knight's Quarterly Magazine, where Derwent Coleridge contributed a number of items usually signed Davenand Cecil.
2
Derwent took his B.A. at Cambridge in 1824.

-84-

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