Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Hartley Coleridge; Grace Griggs Evelyn et al. | Go to book overview

the letter is concerned with periodical contributions, showing that Hartley was obviously trying to support himself by writing for the magazines; for during the next five years he published essays or poems in Blackwood's, Janus, The Gem, The Literary Souvenir, The Christian Mother's Magazine, and The Winter's Wreath.

Perhaps the most entertaining portion of this letter is that devoted to Wordsworth. Derwent had published in 1826 an essay on Wordsworth in the Metropolitan Quarterly Magazine (containing a passage on Wordsworth's later poems, highly offensive to S. T. Coleridge), and Hartley's own remarks on Wordsworth arose naturally from a consideration of his brother's essay.

The engagement of Coleridge's only daughter, Sara, to her cousin, Henry Nelson Coleridge (a son of Colonel James Coleridge), was at first objected to by Coleridge, mainly on the ground of consanguinity. Her marriage, which took place on September 3, 1829, was, however, a happy one. Many of the misgivings of the family were, as Hartley's remarks show, due to a dislike of Henry Nelson Coleridge's rather gay and flippant Six Months in the West Indies; but in later years Henry Nelson Coleridge, as friend, disciple, and Boswell of Coleridge, and friend and protector of Hartley, took an important place in the family.


LETTER 28
TO DERWENT COLERIDGE, Helston, Cornwall.

Dear Snifterbreeches [ 1826.]

Beg your Reverence's pardon--I had forgot that I was addressing a Clergyman--I hope you will not like this--my first epistle directed to you in that sacred character--at all the worse, for coming by the hands of a fair quaker1--who is bound in conscience to call your church a steeple-house, and, far worse, when you shall be installed, as I hope you will be, in a Daniel Lambert2 of a Rectory, to refuse paying your tithes. Seriously, my dear Derwent, (alas, how hard is it for a wounded and self-reproaching spirit to be serious) I rejoice to address you in that holy function, which I trust, I had almost said, I know, you have not taken upon you, lightly or irreverently, or for mere motives of interest, but with due sense of all its aweful responsibilities. I can indeed conceive no situation more painful, more humiliating, than that of a man of subtle intellect and tender conscience, reluctantly

____________________
1
This letter was delivered to Derwent by Mrs. Charles Fox.
2
Daniel Lambert ( 1770-1809), keeper of Leicester jail, was the fattest man on record. He weighed at his death 52 3/4 stone.

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.