Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Hartley Coleridge; Grace Griggs Evelyn et al. | Go to book overview

Fleming,1 the best I have written, at least in versification and expression. She was born on Sunday. You probably saw the Tea-table in B.2 but it does not look so well in print as it sounded when Elizabeth Warde listen'd to it. Ladies' praise makes one overrate one's nothings sadly. However, it was not too bad to keep company with Delta and other periodic rhimers in the same luminous miscellany. One cannot select one's company in a stage-coach. I had a letter from Elizabeth the other day, to which I must soon reply. Uncle Southey, you know, is come home. I did not see him as he passed--indeed such hasty meetings only tantalize and flurry. Edith, I hear is better, and going to be married. I hope her husband will be a Bishop--and even that will not give Eney a Title for which I cannot help thinking she was born. You know I suppose that she is the lofty beauty of the Sonnet. I will write, I think, to Aunt Lovell. I can make the freest with her, and perhaps it may amuse her. My friend Archer is gone to Ireland, his native isle, but talks of returning. He is a fine creature, perfectly mad about Wordsworth and Joanna Baillie, and, tho' we hardly ever thought alike, we sympathized admirably. I hope the Rydal Mountians are not hindered by the weather, which certainly has a design against all our lives. I will see them as soon as stirring is feasible-- but I am not quite so well as usual myself. Don't be alarmed, however, it's only a slight cold. We had a sight of Christmas dances--And one does get cold on such occasions. It is of no use to cross--you could not read, so with Love to Hal and his wife,

I remain your brat
H.C.

Mrs. Carter is gone--for which I am truly sorry. She wishes to purchase Pa's works, but I must talk about this to Henry. Mr. Brancker is in Liverpool. I will shortly write to Father--Love and duty if you see him.


LETTER 35
To MRS. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE, Hampstead, London.

Rydal Mount, April 16, 1831

My dear Mother

I enclose you a bill--twelve months after date--which I received this morning from W . J. St. Aubyn. It will be at

____________________
1
Cf. Poems, 67, 'The Sabbath-Day's Child.'
2
Cf. Blackwood's Magazine, March 1830.

-130-

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