Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

Chantley, and don't know who had. I am not quite a month in arrears with Mrs. Fleming. I mean, it is not a month since I paid all that was due, leaving a small balance in their hands. I received £20 for the two parts of 'Ignoramus', the third is forthcoming. But literary matters I reserve for Henry. Dod- a-bless a little soul--does it read Greek with its good man of a night? Lord love it. You see she never grows any older in my imagination. But she is a sweet creature. Is the little one weaned? And how is he going on? I am sincerely glad that my Father is in his be[tter] way. I will write to him, perhaps to Mrs. Gillman first. Mrs. Carter is desirous to possess my father's Poems, in the shape they were last produced in. If they be sent down to me, I can convey them to her, and price, carriage, etc., will be duly paid. I must contrive to get all my father's works myself. I have none of them but the Aids to Reflection, which I rejoice to see a new Edition of announced.1

With best love to Sara and Henry,
I remain, Your dutiful son,
[No signature.]

P.S. Will look over matters and send just account, when I have done the article I am about, which I must go home and labour at directly, and try to write a more eloquent style than I have perpetrated in this epistle. You will probably see Mr. Wordsworth, and Dora, William, etc. I hope I shall see or hear of the Keswickians ere long. They are well at present.

Archer is returned.


LETTER 36 To MRS. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE, No. 1 Downshire Place, Downshire Hill, Hampstead, near London

Grasmere, October 10, 1831

My dear Mother

I deserve it, and yet to hint the possibility that a son could outlive his affection for his mother, and such a mother, is sufficient reproach for a fault great as mine. You cannot, do not seriously suspect this, for if you did, no profession, scarce any performance of mine, could exorcise the evil spirit from your soul, for dead affections have no earthly

____________________
1
The second edition of Coleridge Aids to Reflection appeared in 1831.

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