Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

is sadly afflicted in his eyes? I must now conclude. My trunks will come in a day or two. I am well off for clothes. Thank dear Mother for the parcel, and Aunt Eliza for the Handkerchiefs--Love once more to both. When Miss Smith returns to town, I will send a huge article of a Letter, in which all things shall be made clear, if not satisfactory. Till Thursday Adieu--

Yours truly H.C.


LETTER 44
To MRS. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE, No. 1, Downshire Place, Hampstead, London.

Grasmere, Monday, Oct. 7, 1833.

My dear Mother

Not knowing whether you have or have not, seen my letter of last Sunday to Henry, I must run the risk of repetition as to the most important details thereof. I did hope, before this time, to have been enabled to tell you more than is therein contained, but as I have not heard any thing from Leeds, I can only give you the same general information as I gave to Hal, which I shall endeavour to exhibit in the most comprehensible form.

You say, kindly, far too kindly, that you will not reproach me for any transactions at Leeds: but perhaps you are not aware that with regard to my finally quitting Leeds no reproach whatever is due. I left, neither clandestinely, nor in debt nor in disgrace--not in debt, at least, to any person but Bingley; and I should think, if matters were fairly arranged, not to him. For see, there are on his side £10, which he gave me, to pay a few pressing debts, when I left Ambleside, £5, which I afterwards sent to Ambleside, two suits of black clothes, two hats, one pair of boots, one pair of shoes, my washing during the time I was at Leeds, my lodging at a guinea a week during the time I was at Mrs. Mason's, and my lodging and board at his own house for the remainder of my sojourn. If to this be added postage, and some few shillings, not twenty I am sure, you see the whole of my debt to him. Per contra; there should be, one third of the sum engaged for as respects the 'Worthies,' the Poems, and some little jobs of which we never made any account. By the way, I should have added, the expences of my journey to Kendal

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