Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

alike from intensity of intellectual exertion and perturbation of feeling. My father could not have written the Ancient Mariner at sixty, yet who will say that his Genius declined? The Genius was there as mighty as ever, but the frame could no longer endure to set it a going. Most delightful it is that Wordsworth has opened for himself a path so well suited to his declining years. I do wish, however, that there had been a little less of Lowther Castle, and that he had not call'd poor old Lady Lonsdale a Nymph.1 As for the Politics-- No doubt you have heard of Miss Senhouse's happy union with Squire Pocklington--What a name--Edith changed for the worse,2 but from Senhouse to Pocklington. What a declension! By the way--how is Edith's darling? I wonder if she is at all fond of it. I cannot imagine that queen--like creature having any thing to do with clouts, nightcaps, and other unsightly and anti-aristocratic utensils which are entailed upon maternity in the lower and middle orders. She decidedly should have been a countess, and had nothing to do with the bantling, except when it was brought in with its finest lace cap and muslin robes, when she thought fit to be interesting and madonna like, and to shew that the Noblesse are not incapable of natural affection. We have had a gay Christmas--the festivities are now pretty well over. I meant to describe some of them but have left no room. Miss E. Carlton is married, and now the Revd. Mrs. Bates--her brother is about to marry Miss North. You know that both the Miss Whites are spliced--with revolution moving upon earth and comets whisking their tails about in the sky--what the Devil can folks be thinking of. Thank you for the collar. I forgot to say any thing about Giles's bill--but I have nothing to say except to thank you. If it was not paid before, all's right. Mr. Dawes is well. I dined with him last week. Love to . . . Bless a Soul. Your affectionate son and brother. . . . .3 of writing this small hand. H.C.


LETTER 53

To HENRY NELSON COLERIDGE. Grasmere, May 8, 1836.

Dear Hal

Returning on Friday evening from a pleasant party at my

____________________
1
See 'Lines written in the album of the Countess of Lonsdale, Nov. 5, 1834'.
2
Edith Southey, who married the Rev. John W. Warter.
3
MS. blurred by stamp.

-187-

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