Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Hartley Coleridge; Grace Griggs Evelyn et al. | Go to book overview

While Hartley was at Sedbergh in 1837, his excellent hostess, Mrs. Fleming, died. His mother, who, now as always, seems to have regarded her son as a helpless child, was solicitous about what arrangements he could make for board and lodging. 'It is natural to think', she wrote to Hartley on July 8, 1837,

'that you would have written on the news of the death of poor Mrs. Fleming, whose departure from this vale of tears is so much regretted by your anxious mother, as most certainly by yourself. . . . I was sorry to infer [from Mrs. Wordsworth's letter] that you could no longer expect a home under that roof. Nothing was said about the books, cloathes, etc.--which you left there, but, doubtless you have had some intimation of these matters from the heirs or executors of your late poor friend. Mrs. Wordsworth seemed to think you intended to stay where you are, [Sedbergh] but she will see, from my letter, that you intend to stay till midsummer. . . . Do not keep me in suspense about your future plans, as I cannot be easy till I know what you mean to do. I hope you will not think of a public house as in the instance of poor J. Bell's house, which you made your home so many years. I suppose there are persons in Grasmere who would be glad to have you, if only for the sum paid for your board--but I guess it is not very easy to meet with a home for you so suitable as your last.'

Fortunately, Hartley was able to make his home with a young farmer and his wife, William and Eleanor Richardson, who watched over him tenderly, and with whom he stayed until his death in 1849.


LETTER 60

To MRS. HENRY NELSON COLERIDGE, 10 Chester Place, Regent's Park, London.

[Postmark, September 7, 1837.]

My dear Sister

Thank you for your Fairy Tale,1 which I [have] not yet read, so cannot praise. It will, however, make an excellent text for a review, in which I can do it ample justice without letting the cat out of the bag. I was right glad of all your letters, for I was growing anxious about you all, although the news is not quite so good as I could have wished, it is not on the whole, worse than I anticipated. I am now comfortably settled,

____________________
1
Sara Coleridge Phantasmion was published in 1837. In this fairy tale Coleridge's daughter shows that she inherited to no little degree the imaginative power of her father.

-212-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.